2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166370
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Adjustment on Three Types of Dialysis
Author(s):
Courts, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Courts, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Adult Health Division, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: nancy_courts@uncg.edu
Abstract:
End-stage renal disease (ESRD) and dialysis effect patients physically, psychologically, and socially with depression and anxiety as common responses. The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to explore the psychosocial adjustment of male patients on three types of dialysis: home hemodialysis (HHD), incenter hemodialysis (HD), and peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study addressed two questions: Do anxiety, depression, and psychosocial adjustment to illness levels differ among patients on HHD, incenter HD, and PD? Do patients on HHD and incenter HD identify the same hemodialysis stressors? Anxiety was measured with the Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), depression with the Generalized Contentment Scale (GCS), psychosocial adjustment to illness with the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Self-Report Scale (PAIS-SR), and perception of hemodialysis stressors with the Hemodialysis Stressor Scale (HSS). Five male subjects in each group (N=15), matched for age, education, and length of time on dialysis, participated in the study. The subjects were contacted by telephone and the study explained. After agreeing to participate, each subject received the instruments with an addressed envelop for return. Return of the instruments indicated consent to participate in the study. The researchers then contacted the subjects to make an appointment for an interview. Written consent was obtained for the taped interview. In spite of the limitations of this study, including the small sample size, the findings were interesting. In general, subjects on HHD demonstrated lower levels of anxiety and depression scores and higher levels of psychosocial adjustment to illness. Perception of hemodialysis stressors was lower for the HHD group. In addition, the interviews provided additional interesting findings suggesting that further research is needed with a larger, randomized sample representative of the dialysis population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Adjustment on Three Types of Dialysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCourts, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Courts, PhD, Associate Professor, University of North Carolina-Greensboro School of Nursing, Adult Health Division, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, email: nancy_courts@uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166370-
dc.description.abstractEnd-stage renal disease (ESRD) and dialysis effect patients physically, psychologically, and socially with depression and anxiety as common responses. The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to explore the psychosocial adjustment of male patients on three types of dialysis: home hemodialysis (HHD), incenter hemodialysis (HD), and peritoneal dialysis (PD). The study addressed two questions: Do anxiety, depression, and psychosocial adjustment to illness levels differ among patients on HHD, incenter HD, and PD? Do patients on HHD and incenter HD identify the same hemodialysis stressors? Anxiety was measured with the Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), depression with the Generalized Contentment Scale (GCS), psychosocial adjustment to illness with the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Self-Report Scale (PAIS-SR), and perception of hemodialysis stressors with the Hemodialysis Stressor Scale (HSS). Five male subjects in each group (N=15), matched for age, education, and length of time on dialysis, participated in the study. The subjects were contacted by telephone and the study explained. After agreeing to participate, each subject received the instruments with an addressed envelop for return. Return of the instruments indicated consent to participate in the study. The researchers then contacted the subjects to make an appointment for an interview. Written consent was obtained for the taped interview. In spite of the limitations of this study, including the small sample size, the findings were interesting. In general, subjects on HHD demonstrated lower levels of anxiety and depression scores and higher levels of psychosocial adjustment to illness. Perception of hemodialysis stressors was lower for the HHD group. In addition, the interviews provided additional interesting findings suggesting that further research is needed with a larger, randomized sample representative of the dialysis population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:50Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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