Health Behaviors of African American Women: Implications of Ethnic Differencesin Lifestyle Behavior Choices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166375
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Behaviors of African American Women: Implications of Ethnic Differencesin Lifestyle Behavior Choices
Author(s):
Felton, Gwen
Author Details:
Gwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu
Abstract:
Ethnicity and gender affect risk for chronic illness. Life expectancy for Black women is 5 years less than that of White women. Women report more positive health behaviors than men, but recent research suggests that African American females have higher prevalence of obesity as well as lower indices of health promoting behaviors than White women. This study investigated ethnic differences in attitudinal and behavioral indices of health promoting behavior among female college students. The sample consisted of 62 pairs of females matched on race (Black/White), body mass (Quetelet Index), and mother's education level. Data were collected using the HPLP, Health Conception Scale, Problem Solving Inventory, and Value survey. The women held similar definitions of health (p=0.16) and problem solving levels (p=0.62). Black students valued health to a greater extent than Whites (X2=4.6, p=.03). Bonferroni method for protecting the type I error rate was used (a=0.05, a1=0.05/6=0.008) to determine differences in HPLP behaviors. Black women differed from white women in nutrition (p=0.001) and interpersonal support (p=0.007) subscales, however they were similar with regard to behaviors of self actualization, health responsibility, exercise, and stress management. More rigorous measures of health behaviors, SES indicators and anthropometric measures of body weight and fitness are indicated to determine the true extent to which ethnic differences impact health promotion behaviors. Findings suggest that health professional must recognize the influence of mediating factors on health behaviors when implementing health promotion programs for different ethnic groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Behaviors of African American Women: Implications of Ethnic Differencesin Lifestyle Behavior Choicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Gwenen_US
dc.author.detailsGwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166375-
dc.description.abstractEthnicity and gender affect risk for chronic illness. Life expectancy for Black women is 5 years less than that of White women. Women report more positive health behaviors than men, but recent research suggests that African American females have higher prevalence of obesity as well as lower indices of health promoting behaviors than White women. This study investigated ethnic differences in attitudinal and behavioral indices of health promoting behavior among female college students. The sample consisted of 62 pairs of females matched on race (Black/White), body mass (Quetelet Index), and mother's education level. Data were collected using the HPLP, Health Conception Scale, Problem Solving Inventory, and Value survey. The women held similar definitions of health (p=0.16) and problem solving levels (p=0.62). Black students valued health to a greater extent than Whites (X2=4.6, p=.03). Bonferroni method for protecting the type I error rate was used (a=0.05, a1=0.05/6=0.008) to determine differences in HPLP behaviors. Black women differed from white women in nutrition (p=0.001) and interpersonal support (p=0.007) subscales, however they were similar with regard to behaviors of self actualization, health responsibility, exercise, and stress management. More rigorous measures of health behaviors, SES indicators and anthropometric measures of body weight and fitness are indicated to determine the true extent to which ethnic differences impact health promotion behaviors. Findings suggest that health professional must recognize the influence of mediating factors on health behaviors when implementing health promotion programs for different ethnic groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:56Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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