2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166376
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pharmaceutical use among school aged children
Author(s):
Francis, Elaine
Author Details:
Elaine Francis, PhD, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: eefranci@com1.med.usf.edu
Abstract:
The use of both prescription and over the counter pharmaceuticals has increased among school aged children. Many of these drugs are taken during school hours and are dispensed by school personnel who are not health care professionals and know little or nothing about the drugs themselves or the medical conditions requiring their use. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which pharmaceuticals are dispensed in schools in one Florida county. All public elementary, middle and high schools, and six private schools in one Florida county were surveyed for one week during the spring of 1995. Two public schools refused to participate. All medications dispensed to children by school personnel during that time were recorded. Demographic characteristics of the children receiving medications relating to sex, race, age, grade and socioeconomic status were also obtained. Findings indicate that 1016 children received pharmaceuticals from personnel in schools during that one week time period, and 5411 doses of medication were dispensed. Thirty-one different categories of drugs were dispensed, including controlled substances. Ritalin was the most widely dispensed drug, comprising 54% of all medications given in public school, and 51% of those given in private schools. Elementary aged children received most of the medication given, and 4% of all elementary school children received medication during school hours. Boys were 2.5 times more likely than girls to be taking medications in school. There was no significant difference in amount of medications dispensed relative to race or socioeconomic status of the schools surveyed. This study reveals the volume and variety of pharmaceuticals that are being dispensed in one Florida county school system, primarily by non-medical personnel. Health professionals are concerned about this growing trend. This data provides the information necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of this school based activity and to design a plan to improve this health service.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePharmaceutical use among school aged childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Elaineen_US
dc.author.detailsElaine Francis, PhD, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: eefranci@com1.med.usf.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166376-
dc.description.abstractThe use of both prescription and over the counter pharmaceuticals has increased among school aged children. Many of these drugs are taken during school hours and are dispensed by school personnel who are not health care professionals and know little or nothing about the drugs themselves or the medical conditions requiring their use. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which pharmaceuticals are dispensed in schools in one Florida county. All public elementary, middle and high schools, and six private schools in one Florida county were surveyed for one week during the spring of 1995. Two public schools refused to participate. All medications dispensed to children by school personnel during that time were recorded. Demographic characteristics of the children receiving medications relating to sex, race, age, grade and socioeconomic status were also obtained. Findings indicate that 1016 children received pharmaceuticals from personnel in schools during that one week time period, and 5411 doses of medication were dispensed. Thirty-one different categories of drugs were dispensed, including controlled substances. Ritalin was the most widely dispensed drug, comprising 54% of all medications given in public school, and 51% of those given in private schools. Elementary aged children received most of the medication given, and 4% of all elementary school children received medication during school hours. Boys were 2.5 times more likely than girls to be taking medications in school. There was no significant difference in amount of medications dispensed relative to race or socioeconomic status of the schools surveyed. This study reveals the volume and variety of pharmaceuticals that are being dispensed in one Florida county school system, primarily by non-medical personnel. Health professionals are concerned about this growing trend. This data provides the information necessary to assess the safety and efficacy of this school based activity and to design a plan to improve this health service.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:45:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:45:57Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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