2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166381
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Increase Direct Care Nurses Involvement in Decisionmaking and Quality Improvement
Author(s):
Doty, Judy
Author Details:
Doty, Judy, MSN, RN, Manager, Pediatric Nursing Education & Quality at the University of Chicago Medical Center, email: judith.doty@uchospitals.edu
Abstract:
HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION: The University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC) is an academic medical center with over a 700 bed capacity for adult and pediatric patients. The Medical Center employs approximately 2000 nurses. BACKGROUND OF PRACTICE INNOVATION: Improving patient outcomes is a top priority in today's healthcare arena. Leading quality improvement initiatives at the unit level has historically been the responsibility of the nurse manager. In 2005, the role of Quality Resource Nurse (QRN) was created to increase direct care nurses involvement in shared decisionmaking and nursing quality improvement initiatives. PRACTICE INNOVATION PURPOSE: To determine how does quality improvement education and mentoring of direct care nurses influence patient care and related outcomes; what skills direct care nurses need in understanding and integrating quality data when designing quality improvement initiatives; and the role of the direct care nurse in addressing organization-wide quality improvement priorities. PRACTICE INNOVATION OBJECTIVES: (1) To educate direct care nurses on quality improvement processes and related methods. (2) To develop a cadre of direct care nurses with knowledge in quality improvement who can serve as a resource at the unit level. (3) To enhance interdisciplinary collaboration around quality improvement initiatives. (4) To assist nurses in developing skills and expertise in locating and integrating evidence into nursing practice. PRACTICE INNOVATION IMPLEMENTATION: (1) QRNs meet monthly with the Managers of Nursing Quality and receive education related to quality improvement topics and methods. (2) QRNs receive 16 hours per month away from patient care to participate in quality improvement activities. Release time may be used to attend the monthly meeting of the QRNs, work on unit-based quality improvement projects, etc. PRACTICE INNOVATION OUTCOMES: (1) Since 2005, QRNs have received education regarding concepts and processes related to quality improvement. (2) QRNs collaborate across units and institutions (adult and pediatric hospitals) to share best practices and successful strategies. For example, when the QRNs from the pediatric units voiced concern regarding appropriate interventions to relieve infantsÆ pain during minor procedures, the QRNs from the Neonatal ICU suggested the use of oral sucrose. Oral sucrose has become an accepted intervention for relieving pain in appropriate infants on the pediatric units. (3) The QRN program has increased the visibility of nursing quality improvement throughout the organization. Several QRNs have assumed leadership roles in showcasing their quality improvement work by presenting posters at the Medical Center's Annual Quality Fair. They also have presented posters during Nurses' Week. CONCLUSIONS: (1) The QRN Program has become an important element to advancing nursing practice and improving patient outcomes at our organization. (2) As our program evolved, we recognized the need to educate all nurses throughout the organization, including nursing leadership, on quality improvement concepts and related processes and methods. (3) Some of the designated QRNs have changed over time, and it has become apparent we need a mechanism to provide new QRNs with similar orientation and training. Future plans include developing on-line education related to nursing quality improvement.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC Magnet Practice Innovations
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIncrease Direct Care Nurses Involvement in Decisionmaking and Quality Improvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoty, Judyen_US
dc.author.detailsDoty, Judy, MSN, RN, Manager, Pediatric Nursing Education & Quality at the University of Chicago Medical Center, email: judith.doty@uchospitals.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166381-
dc.description.abstractHEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION: The University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC) is an academic medical center with over a 700 bed capacity for adult and pediatric patients. The Medical Center employs approximately 2000 nurses. BACKGROUND OF PRACTICE INNOVATION: Improving patient outcomes is a top priority in today's healthcare arena. Leading quality improvement initiatives at the unit level has historically been the responsibility of the nurse manager. In 2005, the role of Quality Resource Nurse (QRN) was created to increase direct care nurses involvement in shared decisionmaking and nursing quality improvement initiatives. PRACTICE INNOVATION PURPOSE: To determine how does quality improvement education and mentoring of direct care nurses influence patient care and related outcomes; what skills direct care nurses need in understanding and integrating quality data when designing quality improvement initiatives; and the role of the direct care nurse in addressing organization-wide quality improvement priorities. PRACTICE INNOVATION OBJECTIVES: (1) To educate direct care nurses on quality improvement processes and related methods. (2) To develop a cadre of direct care nurses with knowledge in quality improvement who can serve as a resource at the unit level. (3) To enhance interdisciplinary collaboration around quality improvement initiatives. (4) To assist nurses in developing skills and expertise in locating and integrating evidence into nursing practice. PRACTICE INNOVATION IMPLEMENTATION: (1) QRNs meet monthly with the Managers of Nursing Quality and receive education related to quality improvement topics and methods. (2) QRNs receive 16 hours per month away from patient care to participate in quality improvement activities. Release time may be used to attend the monthly meeting of the QRNs, work on unit-based quality improvement projects, etc. PRACTICE INNOVATION OUTCOMES: (1) Since 2005, QRNs have received education regarding concepts and processes related to quality improvement. (2) QRNs collaborate across units and institutions (adult and pediatric hospitals) to share best practices and successful strategies. For example, when the QRNs from the pediatric units voiced concern regarding appropriate interventions to relieve infantsÆ pain during minor procedures, the QRNs from the Neonatal ICU suggested the use of oral sucrose. Oral sucrose has become an accepted intervention for relieving pain in appropriate infants on the pediatric units. (3) The QRN program has increased the visibility of nursing quality improvement throughout the organization. Several QRNs have assumed leadership roles in showcasing their quality improvement work by presenting posters at the Medical Center's Annual Quality Fair. They also have presented posters during Nurses' Week. CONCLUSIONS: (1) The QRN Program has become an important element to advancing nursing practice and improving patient outcomes at our organization. (2) As our program evolved, we recognized the need to educate all nurses throughout the organization, including nursing leadership, on quality improvement concepts and related processes and methods. (3) Some of the designated QRNs have changed over time, and it has become apparent we need a mechanism to provide new QRNs with similar orientation and training. Future plans include developing on-line education related to nursing quality improvement.en_US
dc.date.available2011-10-27T15:32:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T15:32:26Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC Magnet Practice Innovationsen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host for further details regarding this item.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.