Preventing Catheter-Associated Blood Stream Infection Rates in Pediatric Intensive Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166390
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing Catheter-Associated Blood Stream Infection Rates in Pediatric Intensive Care
Author(s):
Robeck, Karen; Hagstrom, Sandy
Author Details:
Karen Robeck, BA, RN, Staff Nurse, PICU at University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, email: shagstr1@fairview.org; Sandy Hagstrom, MA, RN, CPNP
Abstract:
HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION: The University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview and the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital, Fairview is a privately owned academic medical center with excellent collaborative partnerships with the University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota Physicians, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, and other allied health professional programs. BACKGROUND OF PRACTICE INNOVATION: A group of staff nurses from the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) developed a project to examine catheter-associated blood stream infection rates (CA-BSI) and prevention. Six staff nurses from the PICU volunteered to champion the project through the following activities: discussion of information gathered from multiple sources, recommendations regarding the development of a practice change, implementation of the practice change, education of staff, and the development of a survey to evaluate staff knowledge of the practice change. This group formed in late 2006 and has been active for over a year. PRACTICE INNOVATION PURPOSE: To decrease the rate of catheter-associated blood stream infections (CA-BSI) in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). PRACTICE INNOVATION OBJECTIVES: Practice questions considered by this committee were: (1) What are the factors associated with CA-BSI in the PICU? (2) What practice changes can be made to decrease the rate of CA-BSI? (3) Who has responsibilities and accountabilities to reduce CA-BSI in the PICU? (4) What education and support do care providers require to incorporate the practice change? (5) Does work flow need to be analyzed to improve the adherence to the practice change? PRACTICE INNOVATION IMPLEMENTATION: (1) Examined current policy regarding insertion procedures of central lines and ongoing care of the line and compared our practice to other PICUs. (2) PICU staff nurses trialed several new intravenous line caps. (3) PICU staff nurses created our own central line dressing change kits. This kit has been implemented in the PICU and will be made available to other patient care units. (4) The physician co-lead was responsible to review with the PICU and Cardiology physician staff the expectations related to insertion of central lines to prevent blood stream infections. (5) A central line insertion cart was created to house all necessary supplies to facilitate compliance with sterile barrier precautions during the central line insertion procedure. (6) Staff nurse champions led the education activities, which included one-to-one individual teaching of new procedures for current staff. (7) A poster that tracks number of days since the last CA-BSI was made clearly visible in the unit hallway. (8) When a CA-BSI is identified, the nurses caring for the patient receive a questionnaire to evaluate what other variables may have resulted in the patient acquiring a CA-BSI; this provides an opportunity for direct caregivers to provide information that may not be available from other sources. (9) In development is an evaluation process with the intent to survey each nurse regarding the practice change process improvement effort. PRACTICE INNOVATION OUTCOMES: Since implementation of the practice change, CA-BSI rates have decreased by 40% over the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: The use of staff nurse champions is an effective method to empower staff involvement in clinical problem solving and quality improvement initiatives. Although this project is ongoing, the direction of the outcome data, showing a 40% decline in CA-BSI, is very promising.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC Magnet Practice Innovations
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host for further details regarding this item.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing Catheter-Associated Blood Stream Infection Rates in Pediatric Intensive Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobeck, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHagstrom, Sandyen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Robeck, BA, RN, Staff Nurse, PICU at University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, email: shagstr1@fairview.org; Sandy Hagstrom, MA, RN, CPNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166390-
dc.description.abstractHEALTHCARE ORGANIZATION DESCRIPTION: The University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview and the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital, Fairview is a privately owned academic medical center with excellent collaborative partnerships with the University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota Physicians, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, and other allied health professional programs. BACKGROUND OF PRACTICE INNOVATION: A group of staff nurses from the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) developed a project to examine catheter-associated blood stream infection rates (CA-BSI) and prevention. Six staff nurses from the PICU volunteered to champion the project through the following activities: discussion of information gathered from multiple sources, recommendations regarding the development of a practice change, implementation of the practice change, education of staff, and the development of a survey to evaluate staff knowledge of the practice change. This group formed in late 2006 and has been active for over a year. PRACTICE INNOVATION PURPOSE: To decrease the rate of catheter-associated blood stream infections (CA-BSI) in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). PRACTICE INNOVATION OBJECTIVES: Practice questions considered by this committee were: (1) What are the factors associated with CA-BSI in the PICU? (2) What practice changes can be made to decrease the rate of CA-BSI? (3) Who has responsibilities and accountabilities to reduce CA-BSI in the PICU? (4) What education and support do care providers require to incorporate the practice change? (5) Does work flow need to be analyzed to improve the adherence to the practice change? PRACTICE INNOVATION IMPLEMENTATION: (1) Examined current policy regarding insertion procedures of central lines and ongoing care of the line and compared our practice to other PICUs. (2) PICU staff nurses trialed several new intravenous line caps. (3) PICU staff nurses created our own central line dressing change kits. This kit has been implemented in the PICU and will be made available to other patient care units. (4) The physician co-lead was responsible to review with the PICU and Cardiology physician staff the expectations related to insertion of central lines to prevent blood stream infections. (5) A central line insertion cart was created to house all necessary supplies to facilitate compliance with sterile barrier precautions during the central line insertion procedure. (6) Staff nurse champions led the education activities, which included one-to-one individual teaching of new procedures for current staff. (7) A poster that tracks number of days since the last CA-BSI was made clearly visible in the unit hallway. (8) When a CA-BSI is identified, the nurses caring for the patient receive a questionnaire to evaluate what other variables may have resulted in the patient acquiring a CA-BSI; this provides an opportunity for direct caregivers to provide information that may not be available from other sources. (9) In development is an evaluation process with the intent to survey each nurse regarding the practice change process improvement effort. PRACTICE INNOVATION OUTCOMES: Since implementation of the practice change, CA-BSI rates have decreased by 40% over the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: The use of staff nurse champions is an effective method to empower staff involvement in clinical problem solving and quality improvement initiatives. Although this project is ongoing, the direction of the outcome data, showing a 40% decline in CA-BSI, is very promising.en_US
dc.date.available2011-10-27T15:32:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T15:32:39Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC Magnet Practice Innovationsen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host for further details regarding this item.-
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