The Reliability and Validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised, Numeric Rating Scale and Iowa Pain Thermometer for Postoperative Pain Assessment in Older Chinese Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/177043
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Research Study
Title:
The Reliability and Validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised, Numeric Rating Scale and Iowa Pain Thermometer for Postoperative Pain Assessment in Older Chinese Adults
Author(s):
Li, Li; Herr, Keela; Chen, Pingyan
Author Details:
Li Li, MSN, RN, Director, Department of Nursing at Zhujiang Hospital Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China
Abstract:
The Reliability and Validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised, Numeric Rating Scale and Iowa Pain Thermometer for Postoperative Pain Assessment in Older Chinese Adults
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised (FPS-R), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and the Iowa Pain Thermometer (IPT) for pain assessment in Chinese surgical elders. The specific objectives were to: (a) determine failure rates for each scale, and relationships of failure with subject’s age, gender, education level, and cognitive status, (b) examine the reliability of the three scales, (c) examine the validity of each pain rating scale to detect changes in current, least and worst pain postoperative pain intensity, and the sensitivity to detect changes in analgesic efficacy, and (d) determine scale preference considering age, gender, education level, and cognitive status.
A convenience sample of 180 Chinese older adults with scheduled surgery ranging in age from 65 to 95 years (mean=72.1, SD=5.7) were obtained at a university-affiliated hospital. On the day before operation, recalled pain and anticipated postoperative pain intensity were rated by patients with three scales presented in randomized order and then cognitive function was measured. On the first three postoperative days, subjects were randomly assigned to scale order and completed the three scales to assess current, worst and least pain on each day. On the third postoperative day, single retrospective ratings on worst, least, and average pain for the three days for each scale were also obtained and scale preferences were investigated.
The findings indicated that the failure rates for all three scales were extremely low. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) across current, worst, and least pain on each postoperative day were consistently high (0.949-0.965), and all scales at each rating were strongly correlated (r=0.833-0.962). Pain scores significantly decreased during the three postoperative days and all three scales were sensitive in evaluating patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) efficacy. The scale most preferred was the IPT (54.7%), followed by the FPS-R (28.5%) and the NRS (15.6%). No significant differences were noted in subject preference by age and cognitive status, but gender and education level were significantly related to preference for the IPT and the FPS-R. The IPT was most preferred by male (66.7%) while the FPS-R preferred by female (46.4%). In both education groups, the IPT was most preferred (=6yrs, 54.1%; >6yrs, 56.1%).
This study provides important information in the use of pain assessment tools in Chinese surgical elders. Although all three scales demonstrate good reliability, validity and sensitivity, the IPT appears to be a better choice based on patient preference.
Research Data
Study Type: Funded-International
Sample Size: 180
Minimum Age: 65
Maximum Age: 95
Dependency: Other
Data Collection Method: Other
Data Analysis Method: Other
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
2008
Citation:
Li, L., Herr, K., & Chen, P. (2009). Postoperative pain assessment with three intensity scales in Chinese elders. Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, 41(3), 241-249. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2009.01280.x
Description:
Recipient of STTI International Small Grant in 2007.
Note:
The Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.; This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typeResearch Studyen_GB
dc.titleThe Reliability and Validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised, Numeric Rating Scale and Iowa Pain Thermometer for Postoperative Pain Assessment in Older Chinese Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lien_US
dc.contributor.authorHerr, Keelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Pingyanen_US
dc.author.detailsLi Li, MSN, RN, Director, Department of Nursing at Zhujiang Hospital Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Chinaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/177043-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Reliability and Validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised, Numeric Rating Scale and Iowa Pain Thermometer for Postoperative Pain Assessment in Older Chinese Adults</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Faces Pain Scale Revised (FPS-R), the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and the Iowa Pain Thermometer (IPT) for pain assessment in Chinese surgical elders. The specific objectives were to: (a) determine failure rates for each scale, and relationships of failure with subject’s age, gender, education level, and cognitive status, (b) examine the reliability of the three scales, (c) examine the validity of each pain rating scale to detect changes in current, least and worst pain postoperative pain intensity, and the sensitivity to detect changes in analgesic efficacy, and (d) determine scale preference considering age, gender, education level, and cognitive status. <br/>A convenience sample of 180 Chinese older adults with scheduled surgery ranging in age from 65 to 95 years (mean=72.1, SD=5.7) were obtained at a university-affiliated hospital. On the day before operation, recalled pain and anticipated postoperative pain intensity were rated by patients with three scales presented in randomized order and then cognitive function was measured. On the first three postoperative days, subjects were randomly assigned to scale order and completed the three scales to assess current, worst and least pain on each day. On the third postoperative day, single retrospective ratings on worst, least, and average pain for the three days for each scale were also obtained and scale preferences were investigated. <br/>The findings indicated that the failure rates for all three scales were extremely low. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) across current, worst, and least pain on each postoperative day were consistently high (0.949-0.965), and all scales at each rating were strongly correlated (r=0.833-0.962). Pain scores significantly decreased during the three postoperative days and all three scales were sensitive in evaluating patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) efficacy. The scale most preferred was the IPT (54.7%), followed by the FPS-R (28.5%) and the NRS (15.6%). No significant differences were noted in subject preference by age and cognitive status, but gender and education level were significantly related to preference for the IPT and the FPS-R. The IPT was most preferred by male (66.7%) while the FPS-R preferred by female (46.4%). In both education groups, the IPT was most preferred (=6yrs, 54.1%; >6yrs, 56.1%).<br/>This study provides important information in the use of pain assessment tools in Chinese surgical elders. Although all three scales demonstrate good reliability, validity and sensitivity, the IPT appears to be a better choice based on patient preference. </td></tr></table> <strong>Research Data</strong><br />Study Type: Funded-International<br /> Sample Size: 180<br /> Minimum Age: 65<br /> Maximum Age: 95<br /> Dependency: Other<br /> Data Collection Method: Other<br /> Data Analysis Method: Otheren_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T01:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T01:18:23Z-
dc.identifier.citationLi, L., Herr, K., & Chen, P. (2009). Postoperative pain assessment with three intensity scales in Chinese elders. Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, 41(3), 241-249. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2009.01280.xen_US
dc.identifier.issn1527-6546en_US
dc.identifier.citationLi, L., Herr, K., & Chen, P. (2009). Postoperative pain assessment with three intensity scales in Chinese elders. Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, 41(3), 241-249. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2009.01280.xen_US
dc.descriptionRecipient of STTI International Small Grant in 2007.en_US
dc.description.noteThe Sigma Theta Tau International grant application that funded this research, in whole or in part, was completed by the applicant and peer-reviewed prior to the award of the STTI grant. No further peer-review has taken place upon the completion of the STTI grant final report and its appearance in this repository.en
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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