2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182002
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Avoiding the Slippery Slopes: Best Practices to Reduce Falls
Author(s):
Mokracek, Marilyn
Author Details:
Marilyn Mokracek, RN, MSN, CCRN, NE-BC, Nurse Manager, St. Lukes Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: mmokracek@sleh.com
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background: A Fall Prevention Best Practice Team was implemented to identify innovative approaches to help patients avoid the slippery slopes and to reduce the number of patient falls. Data demonstrated no correlation between consistent documentation of fall risk assessment and overall reduction in falls. Identification of patients at risk for falls didn't correlate with subsequent implementation of fall prevention interventions. Strategy: Three best practices identified in current literature were selected, piloted, and implemented. Best Practice #1 aimed to create visual reminders to cue patients, families, and staff of patients fall risk. Interventions included: posting safety signage, a stop sign, in patient rooms; use of colored non-skid patient socks yellow: high-risk red: patient fell. Best Practice #2 implemented the safety huddle as a part of change-of-shift communication on each patient care unit. Patients identified at a high risk for falls were labeled community property and every staff member responded to their call light. Best Practice #3 was a post-fall algorithm which includes an immediate fall debriefing within one hour after every fall. Critical information and feedback enables the capture of data that may otherwise be lost when reporting is delayed. Results: Implementation of the three best practices helps patients avoid the slippery slope while keeping nursing staff focused on fall prevention rather than on fall risk assessment. Following this three-fold best practice implementation, fall rates decreased 18% and falls with injury decreased 11%.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAvoiding the Slippery Slopes: Best Practices to Reduce Fallsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMokracek, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsMarilyn Mokracek, RN, MSN, CCRN, NE-BC, Nurse Manager, St. Lukes Episcopal Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: mmokracek@sleh.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182002-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background: A Fall Prevention Best Practice Team was implemented to identify innovative approaches to help patients avoid the slippery slopes and to reduce the number of patient falls. Data demonstrated no correlation between consistent documentation of fall risk assessment and overall reduction in falls. Identification of patients at risk for falls didn't correlate with subsequent implementation of fall prevention interventions. Strategy: Three best practices identified in current literature were selected, piloted, and implemented. Best Practice #1 aimed to create visual reminders to cue patients, families, and staff of patients fall risk. Interventions included: posting safety signage, a stop sign, in patient rooms; use of colored non-skid patient socks yellow: high-risk red: patient fell. Best Practice #2 implemented the safety huddle as a part of change-of-shift communication on each patient care unit. Patients identified at a high risk for falls were labeled community property and every staff member responded to their call light. Best Practice #3 was a post-fall algorithm which includes an immediate fall debriefing within one hour after every fall. Critical information and feedback enables the capture of data that may otherwise be lost when reporting is delayed. Results: Implementation of the three best practices helps patients avoid the slippery slope while keeping nursing staff focused on fall prevention rather than on fall risk assessment. Following this three-fold best practice implementation, fall rates decreased 18% and falls with injury decreased 11%.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:05:18Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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