2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182003
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Injury Prevention via Minimal Lift Enculturation
Author(s):
Montgomery, Meryl
Author Details:
Meryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Nursing QI Coordinator/MPD, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: In the context of numerous staff injuries, lost work days, millions of dollars in claims and a culture of manual lifting, nurses at all levels were included on task forces to conduct research, benchmark, and review best practices for prevention of injury of both patients and staff, and determine organizational root causes and data trends. In our baseline analysis of beliefs via surveys and focus groups, we observed nurses harbored multiple misperceptions regarding the causes and prevention of personal injury. Multiple interventions were piloted and implemented including embedded shift patient handling algorithms in the EMR; purchase of new equipment and devices; minimal lift policies; clear expectations regarding use of devices; designation of a RN coordinator of the program; and intensive demonstration based education. Special attention was paid to involving nurses in fundamental decisions such as types of devices, location on unit, storage and cleaning, naming the program and incorporation into charting. Several nurses in each unit assumed the role of educator and role model for a culture of minimal lift. In the first six months, injury rate has dropped 97% and there have been no missed days or costs due to RN injury. Cultural norms seem to be changing. Significant gains were realized in the following areas: missed work due to moving patients need to plan patient lifting to prevent injury understanding that patients can be adversely affected by manual lifting noting the cause of staff injuries preferred use of patient handling equipment and devices.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInjury Prevention via Minimal Lift Enculturationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Merylen_US
dc.author.detailsMeryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Nursing QI Coordinator/MPD, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182003-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: In the context of numerous staff injuries, lost work days, millions of dollars in claims and a culture of manual lifting, nurses at all levels were included on task forces to conduct research, benchmark, and review best practices for prevention of injury of both patients and staff, and determine organizational root causes and data trends. In our baseline analysis of beliefs via surveys and focus groups, we observed nurses harbored multiple misperceptions regarding the causes and prevention of personal injury. Multiple interventions were piloted and implemented including embedded shift patient handling algorithms in the EMR; purchase of new equipment and devices; minimal lift policies; clear expectations regarding use of devices; designation of a RN coordinator of the program; and intensive demonstration based education. Special attention was paid to involving nurses in fundamental decisions such as types of devices, location on unit, storage and cleaning, naming the program and incorporation into charting. Several nurses in each unit assumed the role of educator and role model for a culture of minimal lift. In the first six months, injury rate has dropped 97% and there have been no missed days or costs due to RN injury. Cultural norms seem to be changing. Significant gains were realized in the following areas: missed work due to moving patients need to plan patient lifting to prevent injury understanding that patients can be adversely affected by manual lifting noting the cause of staff injuries preferred use of patient handling equipment and devices.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:05:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:05:28Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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