2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182030
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stress, Hardiness, and Leadership Style: Factors that Foster Nurse Manager Survival
Author(s):
Nash, Sarah
Author Details:
Sarah Nash, RN, MSN, Nurse Manager, Emergency Dept., Sharp Grossmont Hospital, La Mesa, California, USA, email: sarah.nash@sharp.com
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Stress, Hardiness and Leadership Style: An Examination of Factors that Foster Nurse Manager Survival in the Healthcare Environment Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among nurse manager stress, hardiness and leadership style. The study aimed to identify moderating factors that may decrease manager stress, specifically hardiness and transformational leadership practices. Significance to Nursing: Results of this study will provide information for future studies as well as an opportunity to establish leadership education programs that could be developed to address nurse manager stress. Conceptual Framework This study is based on the occupational stress model, hardiness theory and contemporary leadership theory. A conceptual model combines these 3 theories to investigate the relationships among the variables of interest: stress, hardiness and leadership style. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A convenience non-probability sample was used from a population of all nurse managers from five hospitals in a healthcare system in the southwestern region of the United States. The variables of interest, stress, hardiness and leadership style were conceptually defined through a review of literature and operationalized using measures with known psychometric properties. Results: The findings indicated that Stress (perceptions of stress scale) was correlated with the total hardiness scale (r=-.499, p< .01); hardiness was correlated with the total leadership practices scale (r=.379, p
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStress, Hardiness, and Leadership Style: Factors that Foster Nurse Manager Survivalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNash, Sarahen_US
dc.author.detailsSarah Nash, RN, MSN, Nurse Manager, Emergency Dept., Sharp Grossmont Hospital, La Mesa, California, USA, email: sarah.nash@sharp.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182030-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Stress, Hardiness and Leadership Style: An Examination of Factors that Foster Nurse Manager Survival in the Healthcare Environment Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among nurse manager stress, hardiness and leadership style. The study aimed to identify moderating factors that may decrease manager stress, specifically hardiness and transformational leadership practices. Significance to Nursing: Results of this study will provide information for future studies as well as an opportunity to establish leadership education programs that could be developed to address nurse manager stress. Conceptual Framework This study is based on the occupational stress model, hardiness theory and contemporary leadership theory. A conceptual model combines these 3 theories to investigate the relationships among the variables of interest: stress, hardiness and leadership style. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional correlational design. A convenience non-probability sample was used from a population of all nurse managers from five hospitals in a healthcare system in the southwestern region of the United States. The variables of interest, stress, hardiness and leadership style were conceptually defined through a review of literature and operationalized using measures with known psychometric properties. Results: The findings indicated that Stress (perceptions of stress scale) was correlated with the total hardiness scale (r=-.499, p&lt; .01); hardiness was correlated with the total leadership practices scale (r=.379, pen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:05:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:05:50Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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