2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182036
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Humor on Symptoms of Cancer and Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Osterlund, Hob
Author Details:
Hob Osterlund, APRN, BC, Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Queen's Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, email: hosterlund@queens.org
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Significance and Background: This is one of the first randomized controlled trials to examine the impact of a humor intervention on patients with cancer. Purpose: The purpose was to compare symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy, salivary immunoglobulin-A, and salivary cortisol between patients randomized to a humorous or non-humorous intervention. Methods & Analysis: 50 participants were randomized to view a 45-minute humorous DVD or a 45-minute non-humorous DVD. Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), a portion of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI-S), salivary IgA, and salivary cortisol were obtained before and immediately after the intervention. Student T tests were used to analyze changes within and between the two groups. Findings & Implications: Compared to their baselines, participants in the humor group reported a significant post-intervention decrease in symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy (p=0.04) as measured by total ESAS score, as well as a significant post-intervention decrease in anxiety levels as measured by STAI-S score (p=0.03). The humor group showed increased salivary IgA levels (p=0.03), which indicated enhanced immune function. Differences between groups did not reach statistical significance. In post-humor intervention interviews, participants described physiological and psychological improvements which they attributed to feeling more relaxed, more positive and to being distracted from the stress of chemotherapy and cancer. Findings support the use of humor as an inexpensive, efficient, and effective intervention that may complement pharmacological therapy for the management of symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Humor on Symptoms of Cancer and Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOsterlund, Hoben_US
dc.author.detailsHob Osterlund, APRN, BC, Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Queen's Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, email: hosterlund@queens.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182036-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Significance and Background: This is one of the first randomized controlled trials to examine the impact of a humor intervention on patients with cancer. Purpose: The purpose was to compare symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy, salivary immunoglobulin-A, and salivary cortisol between patients randomized to a humorous or non-humorous intervention. Methods & Analysis: 50 participants were randomized to view a 45-minute humorous DVD or a 45-minute non-humorous DVD. Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS), a portion of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI-S), salivary IgA, and salivary cortisol were obtained before and immediately after the intervention. Student T tests were used to analyze changes within and between the two groups. Findings & Implications: Compared to their baselines, participants in the humor group reported a significant post-intervention decrease in symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy (p=0.04) as measured by total ESAS score, as well as a significant post-intervention decrease in anxiety levels as measured by STAI-S score (p=0.03). The humor group showed increased salivary IgA levels (p=0.03), which indicated enhanced immune function. Differences between groups did not reach statistical significance. In post-humor intervention interviews, participants described physiological and psychological improvements which they attributed to feeling more relaxed, more positive and to being distracted from the stress of chemotherapy and cancer. Findings support the use of humor as an inexpensive, efficient, and effective intervention that may complement pharmacological therapy for the management of symptoms related to cancer and chemotherapy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:06:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:06:08Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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