2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182043
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Patient and Nurse Satisfaction Through Professional Practice and Care Delivery Redesign
Author(s):
Quinlan, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Quinlan, DNSc, MPA, RN, CPHQ, Director of Nursing Education, Quality and Research, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA, email: quinlanp@hss.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background In 2007, a decline in patient and nurse satisfaction data motivated the Nursing leadership team of a twice designated, urban Magnet hospital to examine their professional practice model and to make profound changes particularly in the area of care delivery. The process of this redesign was based upon evidence generated by successful organizations that use caring theory as a theoretical foundation. Method After careful review of the literature, the professional practice model was redesigned using a schematic illustrated by Wolf and Greenhouse (2007). The model is made up of five subsystems: a) professional values, b) management c) professional relationships d) compensation and rewards and e) a care delivery system. Structure and process elements within each of the professional model components were articulated and translated to everyday practice. Care delivery was reconfigured using tenets of the Attending Nurse Caring Model (Watson, 2003), which describes a RN role that promotes caring and healing for patients through clinical leadership and relationship-centered interactions. Results By the end of 2009, most of the structure and some process elements of the renewed professional practice model were put into play including those specific to care delivery. A progressive increase in patient satisfaction with nursing care (2007: 85.9, 2008: 87.4 and 2009: 89.4) has been realized since inception of the new model. Nurse satisfaction scores show a similar upward trend. Since 2007, the annual RN response rate increased from 61% to 92% and there is an overall 8% increase in mean Perceived Work Environment scores.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Patient and Nurse Satisfaction Through Professional Practice and Care Delivery Redesignen_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuinlan, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Quinlan, DNSc, MPA, RN, CPHQ, Director of Nursing Education, Quality and Research, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York, USA, email: quinlanp@hss.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182043-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background In 2007, a decline in patient and nurse satisfaction data motivated the Nursing leadership team of a twice designated, urban Magnet hospital to examine their professional practice model and to make profound changes particularly in the area of care delivery. The process of this redesign was based upon evidence generated by successful organizations that use caring theory as a theoretical foundation. Method After careful review of the literature, the professional practice model was redesigned using a schematic illustrated by Wolf and Greenhouse (2007). The model is made up of five subsystems: a) professional values, b) management c) professional relationships d) compensation and rewards and e) a care delivery system. Structure and process elements within each of the professional model components were articulated and translated to everyday practice. Care delivery was reconfigured using tenets of the Attending Nurse Caring Model (Watson, 2003), which describes a RN role that promotes caring and healing for patients through clinical leadership and relationship-centered interactions. Results By the end of 2009, most of the structure and some process elements of the renewed professional practice model were put into play including those specific to care delivery. A progressive increase in patient satisfaction with nursing care (2007: 85.9, 2008: 87.4 and 2009: 89.4) has been realized since inception of the new model. Nurse satisfaction scores show a similar upward trend. Since 2007, the annual RN response rate increased from 61% to 92% and there is an overall 8% increase in mean Perceived Work Environment scores.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:06:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:06:29Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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