2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182048
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Model for Determining Evidence for Best Practice
Author(s):
Ridling, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Ridling, MS, RN, CCRN, Director Nursing Quality and EBP, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washinton, USA, email: debra.ridling@seattlechildrens.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Introduction: The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) by nurses is now expected practice in all Magnet facilities. There are numerous on-line resources available which package evidence in concise formats for access by bedside nurses. Despite these resources, there continue to be many aspects of clinical care for which no evidence-based resource exists. Background: With increased nursing focus on evidence based practice in our organization, we realized the lack of packaged resources would require development of other processes for obtaining evidence to ensure provision of excellent clinical care for our patients. Methods: An EBP model was developed, which included 3 general stages 1) Asking the Clinical Question, 2) Evaluating Evidence, 3) Translation and Dissemination into practice. Implementing the model involved regular meetings with staff and nursing leadership. Standardized processes have been achieved through the development of tools and templates for asking a clinical question, requesting a review of the literature, analyzing literature, completing a list serve questionnaire, summarizing findings, and a communication template. Results: The model was piloted working with a new multidisciplinary department, Clinical Effectiveness, to align our work with EBP work of other disciplines. The first question reviewed was the efficacy of heparin versus normal saline in the patency of PIVs in infants and children. The evaluation is complete, with next steps being translation/dissemination of findings, which will require a change in practice. Conclusions: Creating a standard model is an effective way to approach EBP, particularly when existing resources are not applicable to specialty practice needs.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Model for Determining Evidence for Best Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRidling, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Ridling, MS, RN, CCRN, Director Nursing Quality and EBP, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washinton, USA, email: debra.ridling@seattlechildrens.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182048-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Introduction: The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) by nurses is now expected practice in all Magnet facilities. There are numerous on-line resources available which package evidence in concise formats for access by bedside nurses. Despite these resources, there continue to be many aspects of clinical care for which no evidence-based resource exists. Background: With increased nursing focus on evidence based practice in our organization, we realized the lack of packaged resources would require development of other processes for obtaining evidence to ensure provision of excellent clinical care for our patients. Methods: An EBP model was developed, which included 3 general stages 1) Asking the Clinical Question, 2) Evaluating Evidence, 3) Translation and Dissemination into practice. Implementing the model involved regular meetings with staff and nursing leadership. Standardized processes have been achieved through the development of tools and templates for asking a clinical question, requesting a review of the literature, analyzing literature, completing a list serve questionnaire, summarizing findings, and a communication template. Results: The model was piloted working with a new multidisciplinary department, Clinical Effectiveness, to align our work with EBP work of other disciplines. The first question reviewed was the efficacy of heparin versus normal saline in the patency of PIVs in infants and children. The evaluation is complete, with next steps being translation/dissemination of findings, which will require a change in practice. Conclusions: Creating a standard model is an effective way to approach EBP, particularly when existing resources are not applicable to specialty practice needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:06:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:06:44Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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