2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182053
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of RN Residency Program on New Nurses' Perception of Confidence
Author(s):
Roe, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Roe, MS, APRN, BC, CEN, Dir. Education & Professional Development/Neurology/Orthopedics/Magnet Project Director, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: droe@sjhnh.org
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: In 1982, Benner and Wrubel inferred that, for new Registered Nurses (RNs), integration and awareness of skills is a gradual, stepwise process. Benner (1984) proposed that the new nurse must proceed through steps en-route to becoming an expert nurse. One area of such development is confidence. Benner suggests that gains in clinical skill confidence can be measured even as the new RN maneuvers through orientation. This Quasi-experimental research study involves nurses who participated in a Nurse Resident Program (NRP). The NRP was twelve weeks in duration and involved didactic sessions, clinical experiences, and self-learning. Data from 49 participants was collected over a five year period from September, 2005, through December, 2009 during each NRP in the corresponding year. Participants completed the New Hire Self Evaluation Questionnaire (NHSEQ) which consists of self-report rating scale (0-unable to do to a 4-able to teach others) of eleven professional tasks and fifty-two clinical skills on two occasions: the first day of the NRP program and upon NRP completion. Analysis reveals a statistically significant increase in confidence scores upon NRP completion. Discussion of the results elaborates on the development of self-confidence in new graduate RNs. Interesting and important questions for future research have been raised e.g., complex interactions between self-reported confidence and various self and criterion-oriented measures of clinical skills, possible impact on career satisfaction, and nurse retention, and so on. It is through this baseline study that fuel is provided to other investigators as they look to identify correlations of confidence to skill attainment.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of RN Residency Program on New Nurses' Perception of Confidenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoe, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Roe, MS, APRN, BC, CEN, Dir. Education & Professional Development/Neurology/Orthopedics/Magnet Project Director, St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, New Hampshire, USA, email: droe@sjhnh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182053-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: In 1982, Benner and Wrubel inferred that, for new Registered Nurses (RNs), integration and awareness of skills is a gradual, stepwise process. Benner (1984) proposed that the new nurse must proceed through steps en-route to becoming an expert nurse. One area of such development is confidence. Benner suggests that gains in clinical skill confidence can be measured even as the new RN maneuvers through orientation. This Quasi-experimental research study involves nurses who participated in a Nurse Resident Program (NRP). The NRP was twelve weeks in duration and involved didactic sessions, clinical experiences, and self-learning. Data from 49 participants was collected over a five year period from September, 2005, through December, 2009 during each NRP in the corresponding year. Participants completed the New Hire Self Evaluation Questionnaire (NHSEQ) which consists of self-report rating scale (0-unable to do to a 4-able to teach others) of eleven professional tasks and fifty-two clinical skills on two occasions: the first day of the NRP program and upon NRP completion. Analysis reveals a statistically significant increase in confidence scores upon NRP completion. Discussion of the results elaborates on the development of self-confidence in new graduate RNs. Interesting and important questions for future research have been raised e.g., complex interactions between self-reported confidence and various self and criterion-oriented measures of clinical skills, possible impact on career satisfaction, and nurse retention, and so on. It is through this baseline study that fuel is provided to other investigators as they look to identify correlations of confidence to skill attainment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:07:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:07:00Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.