2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182068
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
People, Process, and Technology Combined to Assure Reliable Medication Practices
Author(s):
Smith, Janis
Author Details:
Janis Smith, RN, DNP, Director, Clinical Information Systems, Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbsmith@cmh.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Computerized clinical information systems (CIS) have potential to support high quality, effective, and efficient patient care. However, barriers to success are abundant and well-documented 1, 2,3. Additionally, the very systems implemented to improve patient care quality and safety are also recognized to create unintended consequences and new problems. 4 When our organization implemented computerized order entry, completed pharmacy automation, and began utilizing an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), we intended to progress toward closing the loop on medication safety. While some processes were safer, the complexity of medication practices necessitates that every system detail be reliable. When any aspect of the interdependent process fails - delays occur, trust diminishes, work-arounds develop, and divisive team behaviors surface. Our aim is to create the world's safest medication practices. We approached the medication process from a systems reliability engineering perspective, implementing a systemic continuous improvement program. The complex, interdependent medication process necessitated improvement in a number of areas: improving reliability of hardware and software, eMAR information, and medication delivery; enhancing the meaningfulness of medication-related alerts; and reaching 100% compliance with medication reconciliation. Improvements have resulted from strengthening the interdisciplinary team responsible for safe medication practices. Every member is essential for continuous improvement: the providers responsible to accurately order, the pharmacists who verify and reliably deliver, and the direct care nurses who safely administer medications. Strengthening the teams effectiveness has improved the reliability of our medication practices. Additionally, the enhanced collaboration has accomplished more than just fixing today's problem: it has created a permanent infrastructure to continuously improve.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePeople, Process, and Technology Combined to Assure Reliable Medication Practicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Janisen_US
dc.author.detailsJanis Smith, RN, DNP, Director, Clinical Information Systems, Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbsmith@cmh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182068-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Computerized clinical information systems (CIS) have potential to support high quality, effective, and efficient patient care. However, barriers to success are abundant and well-documented 1, 2,3. Additionally, the very systems implemented to improve patient care quality and safety are also recognized to create unintended consequences and new problems. 4 When our organization implemented computerized order entry, completed pharmacy automation, and began utilizing an electronic medication administration record (eMAR), we intended to progress toward closing the loop on medication safety. While some processes were safer, the complexity of medication practices necessitates that every system detail be reliable. When any aspect of the interdependent process fails - delays occur, trust diminishes, work-arounds develop, and divisive team behaviors surface. Our aim is to create the world's safest medication practices. We approached the medication process from a systems reliability engineering perspective, implementing a systemic continuous improvement program. The complex, interdependent medication process necessitated improvement in a number of areas: improving reliability of hardware and software, eMAR information, and medication delivery; enhancing the meaningfulness of medication-related alerts; and reaching 100% compliance with medication reconciliation. Improvements have resulted from strengthening the interdisciplinary team responsible for safe medication practices. Every member is essential for continuous improvement: the providers responsible to accurately order, the pharmacists who verify and reliably deliver, and the direct care nurses who safely administer medications. Strengthening the teams effectiveness has improved the reliability of our medication practices. Additionally, the enhanced collaboration has accomplished more than just fixing today's problem: it has created a permanent infrastructure to continuously improve.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:07:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:07:40Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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