2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182073
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improved Patient Outcomes with a Change in Practice for Securing Epidural Catheters
Author(s):
Stewart, Suzanne
Author Details:
Suzanne Stewart, MS, RN, CWOCN, Certified Wound, Ostomy, Continence Nurse, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania, USA, email: stewart_suzanne@guthrie.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The purpose of this initiative was to determine if a change in the type of tape used to secure epidural catheters would improve patient outcomes by decreasing catheter dislodgement/migration, local signs of skin infection related to exposure of the catheter site, as well as decreased local dermatitis/skin breakdown with tape removal. A second goal was to reduce the cost of supplies while maintaining positive patient outcomes. A review of patients charts in March of 2009 showed several patients with epidural catheter dislodgement. This dislodgement resulted in patients having increased pain, local skin infection/dermatitis resulting in partial thickness skin loss. Anesthesia received calls for pain issues related to catheter dislodgement. A two month trial of picture framing the waterproof tape with paper tape was conducted. The practice included the application of alcohol over the paper tape. The overall clinical outcomes were positive with zero cases of catheter dislodgement/migration or skin impairment with the use of the paper tape. These findings were presented to the Anesthesia Department, the Pain Management Team, Nursing Practice and the Hospital Supply Team. Approval was received to change practice to use paper tape for securing epidural catheter dressings. This quality initiative was implemented by the Clinical Pain Nurse Specialist after researching different techniques for securing catheters and participating in a list serve for members of ASPMN. The result of this patient safety initiative was improved patient outcomes with an overall annual costs savings to the facility of $34, 000.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproved Patient Outcomes with a Change in Practice for Securing Epidural Cathetersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Stewart, MS, RN, CWOCN, Certified Wound, Ostomy, Continence Nurse, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania, USA, email: stewart_suzanne@guthrie.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182073-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The purpose of this initiative was to determine if a change in the type of tape used to secure epidural catheters would improve patient outcomes by decreasing catheter dislodgement/migration, local signs of skin infection related to exposure of the catheter site, as well as decreased local dermatitis/skin breakdown with tape removal. A second goal was to reduce the cost of supplies while maintaining positive patient outcomes. A review of patients charts in March of 2009 showed several patients with epidural catheter dislodgement. This dislodgement resulted in patients having increased pain, local skin infection/dermatitis resulting in partial thickness skin loss. Anesthesia received calls for pain issues related to catheter dislodgement. A two month trial of picture framing the waterproof tape with paper tape was conducted. The practice included the application of alcohol over the paper tape. The overall clinical outcomes were positive with zero cases of catheter dislodgement/migration or skin impairment with the use of the paper tape. These findings were presented to the Anesthesia Department, the Pain Management Team, Nursing Practice and the Hospital Supply Team. Approval was received to change practice to use paper tape for securing epidural catheter dressings. This quality initiative was implemented by the Clinical Pain Nurse Specialist after researching different techniques for securing catheters and participating in a list serve for members of ASPMN. The result of this patient safety initiative was improved patient outcomes with an overall annual costs savings to the facility of $34, 000.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:07:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:07:54Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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