2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182078
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Leadership and Union Leadership Collaboration to Improve a Clinical Ladder Process
Author(s):
Tarver, Christine
Author Details:
Christine Tarver, MS, RN, CNS, Director, Medical and Surgical Services, El Camino Hospital, Mountain View, California, USA, email: Chris_Tarver@elcaminohospital.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Nursing Leadership and the Union went into contract bargaining in March 2008, discussions questioned if the Clinical Ladder Program was meeting the needs of our nurses. The contract is negotiated every two years, and the hospital and the union use "Interest Based Bargaining"(IBB) methodology for negotiations. IBB promotes bargaining/negotiating to mutually decided upon shared vision, rather than bargaining "against" one another. Through discussion it was discovered there was a mutual interest in focusing on RN needs, unit needs and patient outcomes. Studies show that national specialty certification improves an RN's clinical knowledge, standards of care, clinical judgment and critical clinical thinking, thereby improving patient outcomes. Through negotiations, it was decided to change the clinical ladder requirements to focus on education and national specialty certification with a performance appraisal process that reflected expert clinical practice, education, leadership, clinical expertise, use of research and consultation. Through the Clinical Ladder Program, nurses are incentivized to realize their professional potential. The hospital and union were able to successfully negotiate the new qualifications for the Clinical Ladder Program, thus becoming a CNIII requires certification and yields a new job description and expectations for professional performance; implementation began in April 2008. Since implementation of the new program, many units have taken on the challenge of supporting their nurses to become certified, and 74 nurses have achieved certification. This increased the number of certified nurses from 119 to 193; this equates to the percentage of certified nurses increasing from 18.5% to 27.3% as of June 2009.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Leadership and Union Leadership Collaboration to Improve a Clinical Ladder Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTarver, Christineen_US
dc.author.detailsChristine Tarver, MS, RN, CNS, Director, Medical and Surgical Services, El Camino Hospital, Mountain View, California, USA, email: Chris_Tarver@elcaminohospital.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182078-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Nursing Leadership and the Union went into contract bargaining in March 2008, discussions questioned if the Clinical Ladder Program was meeting the needs of our nurses. The contract is negotiated every two years, and the hospital and the union use "Interest Based Bargaining"(IBB) methodology for negotiations. IBB promotes bargaining/negotiating to mutually decided upon shared vision, rather than bargaining "against" one another. Through discussion it was discovered there was a mutual interest in focusing on RN needs, unit needs and patient outcomes. Studies show that national specialty certification improves an RN's clinical knowledge, standards of care, clinical judgment and critical clinical thinking, thereby improving patient outcomes. Through negotiations, it was decided to change the clinical ladder requirements to focus on education and national specialty certification with a performance appraisal process that reflected expert clinical practice, education, leadership, clinical expertise, use of research and consultation. Through the Clinical Ladder Program, nurses are incentivized to realize their professional potential. The hospital and union were able to successfully negotiate the new qualifications for the Clinical Ladder Program, thus becoming a CNIII requires certification and yields a new job description and expectations for professional performance; implementation began in April 2008. Since implementation of the new program, many units have taken on the challenge of supporting their nurses to become certified, and 74 nurses have achieved certification. This increased the number of certified nurses from 119 to 193; this equates to the percentage of certified nurses increasing from 18.5% to 27.3% as of June 2009.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:08:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:08:07Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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