2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182079
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Surgical Site Infection Rates in a Surgical Trauma ICU Using Pre-Packaged Bath Products
Author(s):
Tate, Mary Ann
Author Details:
Mary Ann Tate, RN, MSN, CCRN, CCNS, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Centra, Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, email: maryann.tate@centrahealth.com
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background: Nosocomial infections increase hospital costs, length of stay and mortality risks. Reporting requirements and reimbursement denials make it imperative to develop strategies to decrease these rates. Previous research indicates bath basins and hospital tap water may be possible sources of infection. In 2007, a critical care clinical nurse specialist in a surgical trauma intensive care unit (STICU) found the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) to be 0.34%. Objective: The purpose of this study was to reduce potential waterborne nosocomial infections in efforts to decrease nosocomial SSI rates in the STICU. Methods: This study involved the use of prepackaged baths instead of the traditional bath basin, and sterile instead of tap water to irrigate NG tubes and moisten oral mucous membranes. IRB approval was obtained. Nursing staff were informed of study procedures and educated on using prepackaged baths. Patients and families were informed of the study. In February 2008, bath basins were removed from the unit and replaced by prepackaged baths; three months later, sterile water replaced tap water. Prior unit infection rates and demographics were compared with those collected at three and six months post study intervention. Results: A decrease of 41% in SSIs was observed in the year following the intervention. As of February 2009, the SSI rate was 0.2%. Conclusion: The use of prepackaged bath cloths and sterile water in lieu of traditional bath basins and tap water, and comprehensive nursing infection prevention education, may be effective in decreasing nosocomial infections in critically ill surgical patients.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Surgical Site Infection Rates in a Surgical Trauma ICU Using Pre-Packaged Bath Productsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTate, Mary Annen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ann Tate, RN, MSN, CCRN, CCNS, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Centra, Lynchburg, Virginia, USA, email: maryann.tate@centrahealth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182079-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background: Nosocomial infections increase hospital costs, length of stay and mortality risks. Reporting requirements and reimbursement denials make it imperative to develop strategies to decrease these rates. Previous research indicates bath basins and hospital tap water may be possible sources of infection. In 2007, a critical care clinical nurse specialist in a surgical trauma intensive care unit (STICU) found the rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) to be 0.34%. Objective: The purpose of this study was to reduce potential waterborne nosocomial infections in efforts to decrease nosocomial SSI rates in the STICU. Methods: This study involved the use of prepackaged baths instead of the traditional bath basin, and sterile instead of tap water to irrigate NG tubes and moisten oral mucous membranes. IRB approval was obtained. Nursing staff were informed of study procedures and educated on using prepackaged baths. Patients and families were informed of the study. In February 2008, bath basins were removed from the unit and replaced by prepackaged baths; three months later, sterile water replaced tap water. Prior unit infection rates and demographics were compared with those collected at three and six months post study intervention. Results: A decrease of 41% in SSIs was observed in the year following the intervention. As of February 2009, the SSI rate was 0.2%. Conclusion: The use of prepackaged bath cloths and sterile water in lieu of traditional bath basins and tap water, and comprehensive nursing infection prevention education, may be effective in decreasing nosocomial infections in critically ill surgical patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:08:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:08:10Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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