2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182082
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Debriefing After Simulation: Lessons Learned from an Interdisciplinary Clinical Emergencies Course
Author(s):
Toth, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Toth, MSN, RN, Nurse Educator, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ptoth1048@comcast.net
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The emergence of the Rapid Response Team has significantly decreased the amount of codes, but not the fear of the nurse or physician when it comes to emergencies. The Clinical Emergencies course utilizes a blended educational approach; didactic instruction and simulation. Physicians (medical students through Residents) attend the clinical simulation rotating their participation as code chief, anesthesiology, and RN roles. The simulation scenarios are videotaped and reviewed during debriefing sessions that follow. A Fellow and Nurse Educator debrief the team together. Debriefing reveals the pearls of the situation. Teams discuss their thoughts and fears during the simulation, how they could have worked differently. Several scenarios are completed and debriefed throughout the afternoon. Improvement is noted as they have a greater understanding of each others role and begin developing a comfort level. Debriefing empowers staff to communicate their strengths and areas for improvement building collegiality and self confidence while improving patient outcomes. Interdisciplinary simulation scenarios build confidence. Unlike evaluation forms, debriefing allows participants to critique the teams performance as they watch the playback. Several interesting threads have been consistent during the debriefing sessions that warrant further investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDebriefing After Simulation: Lessons Learned from an Interdisciplinary Clinical Emergencies Courseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorToth, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Toth, MSN, RN, Nurse Educator, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: ptoth1048@comcast.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182082-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The emergence of the Rapid Response Team has significantly decreased the amount of codes, but not the fear of the nurse or physician when it comes to emergencies. The Clinical Emergencies course utilizes a blended educational approach; didactic instruction and simulation. Physicians (medical students through Residents) attend the clinical simulation rotating their participation as code chief, anesthesiology, and RN roles. The simulation scenarios are videotaped and reviewed during debriefing sessions that follow. A Fellow and Nurse Educator debrief the team together. Debriefing reveals the pearls of the situation. Teams discuss their thoughts and fears during the simulation, how they could have worked differently. Several scenarios are completed and debriefed throughout the afternoon. Improvement is noted as they have a greater understanding of each others role and begin developing a comfort level. Debriefing empowers staff to communicate their strengths and areas for improvement building collegiality and self confidence while improving patient outcomes. Interdisciplinary simulation scenarios build confidence. Unlike evaluation forms, debriefing allows participants to critique the teams performance as they watch the playback. Several interesting threads have been consistent during the debriefing sessions that warrant further investigation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:08:18Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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