2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182096
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cost Benefit Analysis of a Community Hospital-Based, Doctoral-Prepared Nurse Researcher
Author(s):
Warren, Joan
Author Details:
Joan Warren, PhD, RN-BC, NEA-BC, Director, Professional Practice and Research, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: Joan.Warren@medstar.net
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: How to build a cost effective infrastructure to support evidence-based practice and research is a challenging question faced by Chief Nursing Officers (CNO). Research on effective organizational infrastructures to promote the implementation of evidence-based practice is lacking (Foxcroft & Cole, 2003). Two highly different models used by community and rural settings to build the infrastructure include the creation of a dedicated research department headed by a fulltime doctorally-prepared nurse researcher or the hiring of a doctorally-prepared consultant. Although perceived as difficult to hire and more costly, the benefits of a fulltime nurse researcher can be demonstrated through measurable outcomes. Tangible outcomes include successful grant funding for research studies, development of evidence-based practice standards with better patient outcomes, and cost savings due to improved resource utilization. The intangibles may be of even greater value. The nurse researcher is established as a key nurse executive with a voice at the table who unlike a consultant is acclimated to the culture and has an organizational awareness and enhanced ability to assess resources and gain buy-in from key stakeholders. The researcher benefits the organization by raising the bar for RNs to advance their degrees. The role attracts other advanced practice nurses to the organization creating a highly educated workforce. He/she is also able to cultivate strong partnerships with schools of nursing for the sharing of resources. The synergistic partnership formed between the CNO and nurse researcher was integral to successfully achieving Magnet designation. A cost benefit analysis will provide evidence for creating this infrastructure.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCost Benefit Analysis of a Community Hospital-Based, Doctoral-Prepared Nurse Researcheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWarren, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Warren, PhD, RN-BC, NEA-BC, Director, Professional Practice and Research, Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: Joan.Warren@medstar.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182096-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: How to build a cost effective infrastructure to support evidence-based practice and research is a challenging question faced by Chief Nursing Officers (CNO). Research on effective organizational infrastructures to promote the implementation of evidence-based practice is lacking (Foxcroft & Cole, 2003). Two highly different models used by community and rural settings to build the infrastructure include the creation of a dedicated research department headed by a fulltime doctorally-prepared nurse researcher or the hiring of a doctorally-prepared consultant. Although perceived as difficult to hire and more costly, the benefits of a fulltime nurse researcher can be demonstrated through measurable outcomes. Tangible outcomes include successful grant funding for research studies, development of evidence-based practice standards with better patient outcomes, and cost savings due to improved resource utilization. The intangibles may be of even greater value. The nurse researcher is established as a key nurse executive with a voice at the table who unlike a consultant is acclimated to the culture and has an organizational awareness and enhanced ability to assess resources and gain buy-in from key stakeholders. The researcher benefits the organization by raising the bar for RNs to advance their degrees. The role attracts other advanced practice nurses to the organization creating a highly educated workforce. He/she is also able to cultivate strong partnerships with schools of nursing for the sharing of resources. The synergistic partnership formed between the CNO and nurse researcher was integral to successfully achieving Magnet designation. A cost benefit analysis will provide evidence for creating this infrastructure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:08:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:08:55Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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