2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182100
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building a Tiered Mentorship Program at Your Magnet Hospital: Perils and Pitfalls
Author(s):
White-Williams, Connie
Author Details:
Connie White-Williams, RN, PhD, FAAN, Evidence Base Practice and Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: cwwilli@uabmc.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Although Magnet standards specific to evidence-based practice and research are well known, little information is documented on how to empower nurses to become engaged in evidence-based practice and research projects to meet Magnet standards. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to outline the development of a tiered mentorship program to facilitate evidence-based practice and research among the nursing staff and to discuss the perils and pitfalls encountered during program development. The tiered mentorship program is a one year program in which staff nurses have an opportunity to grow in a partnership with a constant mentor. Tiered mentorship engages nurses to commit time to evidence-based practice and research. Increasing time options may be used by staff in the career advancement program (CAP). Staff have the option of 3 levels of mentoring which include 1) Any interested Staff Nurse: 2 hours a month per year; 2) CAP II: 4 hours a month per year; and 3) CAP III: 8 hours a month per year. Mentors include Center for Nursing Excellence staff and School of Nursing Faculty. The rationale for the year long mentor-mentee partnership includes establishing rapport and fostering behaviors which empower nurses to become evidence-based practice and research champions. The mentor-mentee collaboration is assigned by the Center for Nursing Excellence and meets the needs of the partnership. The collaboration results in the development of an abstract or publication, professional presentation, evidence-based practice project, development or revision of a current evidence-based practice guideline, or research project.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding a Tiered Mentorship Program at Your Magnet Hospital: Perils and Pitfallsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite-Williams, Connieen_US
dc.author.detailsConnie White-Williams, RN, PhD, FAAN, Evidence Base Practice and Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: cwwilli@uabmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182100-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Although Magnet standards specific to evidence-based practice and research are well known, little information is documented on how to empower nurses to become engaged in evidence-based practice and research projects to meet Magnet standards. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to outline the development of a tiered mentorship program to facilitate evidence-based practice and research among the nursing staff and to discuss the perils and pitfalls encountered during program development. The tiered mentorship program is a one year program in which staff nurses have an opportunity to grow in a partnership with a constant mentor. Tiered mentorship engages nurses to commit time to evidence-based practice and research. Increasing time options may be used by staff in the career advancement program (CAP). Staff have the option of 3 levels of mentoring which include 1) Any interested Staff Nurse: 2 hours a month per year; 2) CAP II: 4 hours a month per year; and 3) CAP III: 8 hours a month per year. Mentors include Center for Nursing Excellence staff and School of Nursing Faculty. The rationale for the year long mentor-mentee partnership includes establishing rapport and fostering behaviors which empower nurses to become evidence-based practice and research champions. The mentor-mentee collaboration is assigned by the Center for Nursing Excellence and meets the needs of the partnership. The collaboration results in the development of an abstract or publication, professional presentation, evidence-based practice project, development or revision of a current evidence-based practice guideline, or research project.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:09:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:09:06Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.