2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182108
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reposition 'Em Continuum
Author(s):
Zinnecker, Pam
Author Details:
Pam Zinnecker, RN, BAN, MSNEd, CCRN, ICU Clinician, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: pzinnecker@billingsclinic.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: ICU patients are critically ill and as a consequence face multiple mobility barriers. The ICU patient requires a great deal of medical equipment and the patient is often agitated and/or in pain which increases the difficulty of repositioning the patient. While nurses know that proper patient positioning reduces skin breakdown, mobilizes secretions and aides patient comfort, hemodynamic instability is frequently cited as the reason ICU patients are maintained in a supine position for extended periods of time. In addition to hemodynamic instability in the ICU, skin damage may have occurred in these critically ill patients prior to their arrival in the ICU due to medical events that transpired prior to ICU arrival. These events may include prolonged ambulance time, emergency department or operating room time and poor perfusion during transport. Objectives of the study: 1. Determine current level of staff (RN and MD) pressure ulcer knowledge 2. Determine current staff definition of repositioning 3. Determine frequency of current repositioning practice 4. Determine if use of a standardized approach to repositioning will significantly increase patient repositioning. 5. Determine if changes in repositioning are sustained over a 3 month period.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReposition 'Em Continuumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZinnecker, Pamen_US
dc.author.detailsPam Zinnecker, RN, BAN, MSNEd, CCRN, ICU Clinician, Billings Clinic, Billings, Montana, USA, email: pzinnecker@billingsclinic.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182108-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: ICU patients are critically ill and as a consequence face multiple mobility barriers. The ICU patient requires a great deal of medical equipment and the patient is often agitated and/or in pain which increases the difficulty of repositioning the patient. While nurses know that proper patient positioning reduces skin breakdown, mobilizes secretions and aides patient comfort, hemodynamic instability is frequently cited as the reason ICU patients are maintained in a supine position for extended periods of time. In addition to hemodynamic instability in the ICU, skin damage may have occurred in these critically ill patients prior to their arrival in the ICU due to medical events that transpired prior to ICU arrival. These events may include prolonged ambulance time, emergency department or operating room time and poor perfusion during transport. Objectives of the study: 1. Determine current level of staff (RN and MD) pressure ulcer knowledge 2. Determine current staff definition of repositioning 3. Determine frequency of current repositioning practice 4. Determine if use of a standardized approach to repositioning will significantly increase patient repositioning. 5. Determine if changes in repositioning are sustained over a 3 month period.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:09:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:09:28Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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