2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182120
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Front-End Emergency Department Flow: What Do We Know?
Author(s):
Brennan, Denise
Author Details:
Denise Brennan, RN, MSN-CNL, Emergency Department Nurse Manager, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: dbrennan@lifespan.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Serious issues have arisen in the midst of an ailing, complex healthcare system that have significantly impacted the last line of defense for our valued patients. Nurses have recognized that emergency care is at a breaking point. Evidence based, best practice strategies were explored and a program was developed in consideration of the unique, complex needs of the emergency department (ED). Program development included the use of front-end strategies described in the literature that have been found to improve waiting room throughput and increase patient access to the ED by reducing both the left without being seen (LWBS) and diversion rates. These strategies include the direct to bed approach which can improve patient flow and reduce the bottleneck that typically occurs in the waiting room. Strategies employed by nurses to improve the waiting room experience include conducting routine patient reassessments, initiating diagnostic and treatment protocols and providing updated information to waiting patients were found to improve the LWBS rate and increase patient access. These progressive refinements implemented by nurses were also found to improve patient safety, satisfaction, quality of care, and reduce liability and financial losses to the institution. These findings were used as the foundation for the proposed program. The literature supports this program's intent to improve the front end flow of patients arriving to the emergency department. As ED's struggle to improve their processes, it is important for nurses to be aware of best practice and implement change.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Front-End Emergency Department Flow: What Do We Know?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Deniseen_US
dc.author.detailsDenise Brennan, RN, MSN-CNL, Emergency Department Nurse Manager, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: dbrennan@lifespan.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182120-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Serious issues have arisen in the midst of an ailing, complex healthcare system that have significantly impacted the last line of defense for our valued patients. Nurses have recognized that emergency care is at a breaking point. Evidence based, best practice strategies were explored and a program was developed in consideration of the unique, complex needs of the emergency department (ED). Program development included the use of front-end strategies described in the literature that have been found to improve waiting room throughput and increase patient access to the ED by reducing both the left without being seen (LWBS) and diversion rates. These strategies include the direct to bed approach which can improve patient flow and reduce the bottleneck that typically occurs in the waiting room. Strategies employed by nurses to improve the waiting room experience include conducting routine patient reassessments, initiating diagnostic and treatment protocols and providing updated information to waiting patients were found to improve the LWBS rate and increase patient access. These progressive refinements implemented by nurses were also found to improve patient safety, satisfaction, quality of care, and reduce liability and financial losses to the institution. These findings were used as the foundation for the proposed program. The literature supports this program's intent to improve the front end flow of patients arriving to the emergency department. As ED's struggle to improve their processes, it is important for nurses to be aware of best practice and implement change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:10:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:10:01Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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