2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182126
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Extreme Make Over: Nursing Orientation
Author(s):
Carofiglio, Carol
Author Details:
Carol Carofiglio, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: carol.carofiglio@jeffersonhospital.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The orientation for nurses at our hospital had changed little in the past ten years. Nurses attended a one-week central orientation where hospital policies were reviewed and broad topics like computer training, shared governance model, and customer excellence were taught. After the first week, nurses were placed in the decentralized orientation that provided a unit specific curriculum. A preceptor from the nursing unit that the new hire was assigned to conducted the decentralized orientation. The orientee received a comprehensive checklist that directed the orientation and served as an evaluation tool. Typically ten weeks was spent with the preceptor learning the daily routine, and information and skills required to work on their unit. The nurse manger and clinical nurse specialist served as resources and also evaluated the orientees progress. After receiving Magnet, the CNO requested that orientation be changed to include the Magnet components and to foster the development of a new nurse who would be competent on any Medical-Surgical floor, and could articulate unit specific nurse quality indicators and the Balanced Scorecard. A nurse educator experienced in curriculum revision orchestrated the clinical nurse specialists to create the orientation makeover. Eight core competencies were identified and provided the foundation for the program. A template was created for each competency. The template provides a systematic method for evaluating the competency. The orientee must demonstrate proficiency by the end of the orientation. Learning methods include self-learning modules, case studies, and clinical demonstration. The new format is scheduled for its debut in February 2010.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExtreme Make Over: Nursing Orientationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarofiglio, Carolen_US
dc.author.detailsCarol Carofiglio, PhD, RN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: carol.carofiglio@jeffersonhospital.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182126-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The orientation for nurses at our hospital had changed little in the past ten years. Nurses attended a one-week central orientation where hospital policies were reviewed and broad topics like computer training, shared governance model, and customer excellence were taught. After the first week, nurses were placed in the decentralized orientation that provided a unit specific curriculum. A preceptor from the nursing unit that the new hire was assigned to conducted the decentralized orientation. The orientee received a comprehensive checklist that directed the orientation and served as an evaluation tool. Typically ten weeks was spent with the preceptor learning the daily routine, and information and skills required to work on their unit. The nurse manger and clinical nurse specialist served as resources and also evaluated the orientees progress. After receiving Magnet, the CNO requested that orientation be changed to include the Magnet components and to foster the development of a new nurse who would be competent on any Medical-Surgical floor, and could articulate unit specific nurse quality indicators and the Balanced Scorecard. A nurse educator experienced in curriculum revision orchestrated the clinical nurse specialists to create the orientation makeover. Eight core competencies were identified and provided the foundation for the program. A template was created for each competency. The template provides a systematic method for evaluating the competency. The orientee must demonstrate proficiency by the end of the orientation. Learning methods include self-learning modules, case studies, and clinical demonstration. The new format is scheduled for its debut in February 2010.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:10:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:10:17Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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