2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182138
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections: How Changes in Practice Made the Difference
Author(s):
Conn, Bethann
Author Details:
Bethann Conn, BSN, RN, CCRN, Staff Nurse, Sparrow Health System, Lansing, Michigan, USA, email: Bethannmc1@aol.com
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI), are responsible for 2,400-28,000 deaths due to complications, and on average can cost $296 million to $2.3 billion annually. In accordance with standards put forth by Michigan Health and Hospital Association Keystone Center, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, guidelines for care of the central line catheter patient were established and implemented to decrease CR-BSI. These guidelines included: proper hand hygiene, the use of Chlorhexidine for skin preparation, the use of an antimicrobial dressing, the use of maximum barrier precaution during catheter insertion, and use of the subclavian vein as the preferred site of insertion. An interdisciplinary team including nursing, physicians and infection control put in place several practice changes to maximize compliance with these guidelines. A line insertion cart was created. This allows for the staff nurse to have all necessary supplies in one location when preparing a patient for line insertion. Central line dressing kits had the antimicrobial dressings added, allowing for all supplies needed during routine dressing changes to be readily available. A checklist to monitor guideline compliance during insertion was developed. Nurses were given the authority to monitor and stop the procedure if proper prevention guidelines were not followed. The best practice guidelines for central line insertion have been hard wired through these changes. Since the incorporation of these changes the incidence of CR-BSI has gone from 9.83 (per 1,000 central line days) in 2004 to 0.51 (per 1,000 central line days) in 2009.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCatheter Related Blood Stream Infections: How Changes in Practice Made the Differenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConn, Bethannen_US
dc.author.detailsBethann Conn, BSN, RN, CCRN, Staff Nurse, Sparrow Health System, Lansing, Michigan, USA, email: Bethannmc1@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182138-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI), are responsible for 2,400-28,000 deaths due to complications, and on average can cost $296 million to $2.3 billion annually. In accordance with standards put forth by Michigan Health and Hospital Association Keystone Center, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, guidelines for care of the central line catheter patient were established and implemented to decrease CR-BSI. These guidelines included: proper hand hygiene, the use of Chlorhexidine for skin preparation, the use of an antimicrobial dressing, the use of maximum barrier precaution during catheter insertion, and use of the subclavian vein as the preferred site of insertion. An interdisciplinary team including nursing, physicians and infection control put in place several practice changes to maximize compliance with these guidelines. A line insertion cart was created. This allows for the staff nurse to have all necessary supplies in one location when preparing a patient for line insertion. Central line dressing kits had the antimicrobial dressings added, allowing for all supplies needed during routine dressing changes to be readily available. A checklist to monitor guideline compliance during insertion was developed. Nurses were given the authority to monitor and stop the procedure if proper prevention guidelines were not followed. The best practice guidelines for central line insertion have been hard wired through these changes. Since the incorporation of these changes the incidence of CR-BSI has gone from 9.83 (per 1,000 central line days) in 2004 to 0.51 (per 1,000 central line days) in 2009.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:10:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:10:49Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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