2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182140
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partners in Caring: An Interpretive Context for International Nurses in a Magnet Environment
Author(s):
Crockett, Anita
Author Details:
Anita Crockett, PhD, RN, Director of Nursing Research, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: acrockett@umcaz.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: International nurses coming to practice in the US share common problems that must be addressed to retain them and to warrant recruitment efforts and costs. Several studies reveal this process as either supportive or exploitive. The necessity and demand for their employment is evident, given the nursing shortage in even developed countries; yet the ethical dilemma of recruiting them away from their own countries requires a systematic program for their retention in order to make the recruitment effort worthwhile. Using a combined phenomenological/focused group methodology, the 60 ethnically diverse nurses from Philippines, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, Trinidad, India, and Mexico revealed the "attractive" aspects of working within a Magnet-designated hospital and life experiences driven by professional, economic, and political forces. Data was captured by attentive presence and audiotaping using Denzin's Interpretive Interactionism (1989) as an organizing framework. Findings revealed that the program was effective in improving cultural integration and professional growth. Having cohorts who could understand their plight, a mentorship process and social involvement were all significant, but primary was the separation of these nurses in the work setting to encourage skill development. Perspectives of international nurses inform procedural and economic processes. The need for continuous support was evident, long after any orientation process. Continual social and educational supports are imperative for solidifying their loyalty and retention. The nurse-friendly environment of a Magnet hospital cushions their isolation. Their turnover reduction by more than half over seven years signifies their satisfaction and the institution's cost benefit.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartners in Caring: An Interpretive Context for International Nurses in a Magnet Environmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrockett, Anitaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita Crockett, PhD, RN, Director of Nursing Research, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: acrockett@umcaz.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182140-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: International nurses coming to practice in the US share common problems that must be addressed to retain them and to warrant recruitment efforts and costs. Several studies reveal this process as either supportive or exploitive. The necessity and demand for their employment is evident, given the nursing shortage in even developed countries; yet the ethical dilemma of recruiting them away from their own countries requires a systematic program for their retention in order to make the recruitment effort worthwhile. Using a combined phenomenological/focused group methodology, the 60 ethnically diverse nurses from Philippines, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Korea, Indonesia, Japan, Trinidad, India, and Mexico revealed the "attractive" aspects of working within a Magnet-designated hospital and life experiences driven by professional, economic, and political forces. Data was captured by attentive presence and audiotaping using Denzin's Interpretive Interactionism (1989) as an organizing framework. Findings revealed that the program was effective in improving cultural integration and professional growth. Having cohorts who could understand their plight, a mentorship process and social involvement were all significant, but primary was the separation of these nurses in the work setting to encourage skill development. Perspectives of international nurses inform procedural and economic processes. The need for continuous support was evident, long after any orientation process. Continual social and educational supports are imperative for solidifying their loyalty and retention. The nurse-friendly environment of a Magnet hospital cushions their isolation. Their turnover reduction by more than half over seven years signifies their satisfaction and the institution's cost benefit.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:10:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:10:55Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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