Effectiveness of Surgical Facemasks Versus N-95, Fit-Tested Masks in Preventing N1H1 Transmission in Bedside Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182149
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effectiveness of Surgical Facemasks Versus N-95, Fit-Tested Masks in Preventing N1H1 Transmission in Bedside Nurses
Author(s):
Dufault, Marlene
Author Details:
Marlene Dufault, PhD, RN, Professor of Nursing & Research Consultant, Newport Hospital, Newport, Rhode Island, USA, email: MDufault@mail.uri.edu
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Purpose: The effectiveness of respiratory protective devices during H1N1 pandemic influenza combined with lack of availability of filtering respirators and strain on staff nurses prompted questioning whether surgical masks are as effective as the N-95 filtering mask. A systematic evidence synthesis was conducted to assist informed decision-making for standards of practice and feasibility regarding mask type in large-scale outbreaks such as H1N1. Theoretical Framework: Rogers "adoption of innovations" theory and Dufaults Collaborative Research Utilization Model were used as a framework to guide practice changes. Methods: A three-stage evidence synthesis was conducted. First, nursing students were guided by faculty, clinicians, librarians, and quality/infection control experts, to search, review, critique and translate evidence. The search strategy covering 1984 - 2009 included empirical studies, clinical practice guidelines, reference lists, and grey literature from databases of Cochrane, PubMed, and CINAHL. 29 articles met inclusion criteria for further appraisal; 14 were critiqued for methodological rigor. Second, a strength-of-evidence summary table was constructed. Third, a hospital-wide research roundtable was convened. Scientific merit, clinical applicability, usefulness, feasibility, and potential for translation into best practices and policies were discussed. Results: Evidence was inconclusive on the feasibility, efficacy or effectiveness of surgical masks versus N-95 respirator masks, with most studies graded at levels 4 to 7. One randomized controlled trial showed surgical masks as effective as the N-95. Conclusions/Implications: Evidence supporting patient/provider use of masks and other devices in hospital environments early in an epidemic is inconclusive. More randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are needed to inform policy.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffectiveness of Surgical Facemasks Versus N-95, Fit-Tested Masks in Preventing N1H1 Transmission in Bedside Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDufault, Marleneen_US
dc.author.detailsMarlene Dufault, PhD, RN, Professor of Nursing & Research Consultant, Newport Hospital, Newport, Rhode Island, USA, email: MDufault@mail.uri.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182149-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Purpose: The effectiveness of respiratory protective devices during H1N1 pandemic influenza combined with lack of availability of filtering respirators and strain on staff nurses prompted questioning whether surgical masks are as effective as the N-95 filtering mask. A systematic evidence synthesis was conducted to assist informed decision-making for standards of practice and feasibility regarding mask type in large-scale outbreaks such as H1N1. Theoretical Framework: Rogers "adoption of innovations" theory and Dufaults Collaborative Research Utilization Model were used as a framework to guide practice changes. Methods: A three-stage evidence synthesis was conducted. First, nursing students were guided by faculty, clinicians, librarians, and quality/infection control experts, to search, review, critique and translate evidence. The search strategy covering 1984 - 2009 included empirical studies, clinical practice guidelines, reference lists, and grey literature from databases of Cochrane, PubMed, and CINAHL. 29 articles met inclusion criteria for further appraisal; 14 were critiqued for methodological rigor. Second, a strength-of-evidence summary table was constructed. Third, a hospital-wide research roundtable was convened. Scientific merit, clinical applicability, usefulness, feasibility, and potential for translation into best practices and policies were discussed. Results: Evidence was inconclusive on the feasibility, efficacy or effectiveness of surgical masks versus N-95 respirator masks, with most studies graded at levels 4 to 7. One randomized controlled trial showed surgical masks as effective as the N-95. Conclusions/Implications: Evidence supporting patient/provider use of masks and other devices in hospital environments early in an epidemic is inconclusive. More randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses are needed to inform policy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:11:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:11:20Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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