2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182150
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Contemporary Framework for Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice
Author(s):
Duffy, Melanie
Author Details:
Melanie Duffy, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mduffy@pinnaclehealth.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The first graduate program preparing Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) began in 1954. In 1986, the American Nurses Association described CNS practice as five distinct sub-roles: Practitioner; Educator; Researcher; Consultant; Administrator. In 1998, the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists developed an integrated model for CNS practice consisting of three domains, called spheres of influence. The CNS role has evolved over many years in some countries, while in other countries the role is just beginning to be developed. The presentation will focus on the Spheres of Influence Framework for CNS practice, describe core CNS practice competencies for each domain, and explore the application of the framework to advanced practice internationally. The Spheres of Influence Framework domains are patient/client, nurses and nursing practice, and organization/systems. Specialty clinical expertise, embedded in the patient/client domain, is foundational to CNS practice and represents direct care delivery for quality patient outcomes. The CNS uses specialty clinical expertise in the second domain to advance nursing practice and improve patient outcomes by creating or updating standards of care directing actions of nurses. The CNS articulates the value of nursing in the third domain and removes system barriers to the delivery of safe, cost-effective, evidence-based nursing care. Similarities and differences between this model for CNS practice and models for CNS practice in other countries will be discussed. This framework will create common understanding of the role as it is applied in different specialty practices, care delivery settings, and in different health care systems found around the globe.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Contemporary Framework for Clinical Nurse Specialist Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Melanieen_US
dc.author.detailsMelanie Duffy, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS, Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mduffy@pinnaclehealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182150-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The first graduate program preparing Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) began in 1954. In 1986, the American Nurses Association described CNS practice as five distinct sub-roles: Practitioner; Educator; Researcher; Consultant; Administrator. In 1998, the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists developed an integrated model for CNS practice consisting of three domains, called spheres of influence. The CNS role has evolved over many years in some countries, while in other countries the role is just beginning to be developed. The presentation will focus on the Spheres of Influence Framework for CNS practice, describe core CNS practice competencies for each domain, and explore the application of the framework to advanced practice internationally. The Spheres of Influence Framework domains are patient/client, nurses and nursing practice, and organization/systems. Specialty clinical expertise, embedded in the patient/client domain, is foundational to CNS practice and represents direct care delivery for quality patient outcomes. The CNS uses specialty clinical expertise in the second domain to advance nursing practice and improve patient outcomes by creating or updating standards of care directing actions of nurses. The CNS articulates the value of nursing in the third domain and removes system barriers to the delivery of safe, cost-effective, evidence-based nursing care. Similarities and differences between this model for CNS practice and models for CNS practice in other countries will be discussed. This framework will create common understanding of the role as it is applied in different specialty practices, care delivery settings, and in different health care systems found around the globe.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:11:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:11:22Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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