Maintaining Patency with Blood Infusions: Comparison of IV Normal Saline Infusion vs. Syringe Method

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182156
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Maintaining Patency with Blood Infusions: Comparison of IV Normal Saline Infusion vs. Syringe Method
Author(s):
Elgin, Kimberly
Author Details:
Kimberly Elgin, BSN, CMSRN, RN Transplant Nurse Education Coordinator, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: kwe2y@virginia.edu
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The proper administration of blood products is critical to patient care and many opportunities exist to develop nursing research related to blood administration in acute care nursing. There is no research to support the best method of maintaining line patency during a transfusion. Two of the most common methods of maintaining line patency used in clinical practice are 0.9% sodium chloride bolus syringe flushes and 0.9% sodium chloride continuous infusions. The efficacy of one approach versus the other in maintaining line patency is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if a superior method for maintaining line patency during packed red blood cell infusions could be established. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups, each receiving packed red blood cells, with maintenance of line patency by bolus syringe flushes or continuous infusion. Registered nurses administered the packed red blood cells according to the institutional policy and procedure. The only variable altered was the method of normal saline instillation. This study suggests that there is no difference between the normal saline syringe or infusion flush methods for maintenance of intravenous catheter patency during blood transfusions. Understanding that neither method adversely impacts the administration of packed cells nor requires additional intervention to facilitate a complete transfusion helps the registered nurse to make well grounded practice decisions and provide evidence based care.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaintaining Patency with Blood Infusions: Comparison of IV Normal Saline Infusion vs. Syringe Methoden_GB
dc.contributor.authorElgin, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Elgin, BSN, CMSRN, RN Transplant Nurse Education Coordinator, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: kwe2y@virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182156-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The proper administration of blood products is critical to patient care and many opportunities exist to develop nursing research related to blood administration in acute care nursing. There is no research to support the best method of maintaining line patency during a transfusion. Two of the most common methods of maintaining line patency used in clinical practice are 0.9% sodium chloride bolus syringe flushes and 0.9% sodium chloride continuous infusions. The efficacy of one approach versus the other in maintaining line patency is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if a superior method for maintaining line patency during packed red blood cell infusions could be established. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups, each receiving packed red blood cells, with maintenance of line patency by bolus syringe flushes or continuous infusion. Registered nurses administered the packed red blood cells according to the institutional policy and procedure. The only variable altered was the method of normal saline instillation. This study suggests that there is no difference between the normal saline syringe or infusion flush methods for maintenance of intravenous catheter patency during blood transfusions. Understanding that neither method adversely impacts the administration of packed cells nor requires additional intervention to facilitate a complete transfusion helps the registered nurse to make well grounded practice decisions and provide evidence based care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:11:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:11:39Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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