Addressing Pediatric Clinical Faculty Shortages: An Innovative, Facility-Based Clinical Instructor Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182157
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Addressing Pediatric Clinical Faculty Shortages: An Innovative, Facility-Based Clinical Instructor Program
Author(s):
Eliades, Aris
Author Details:
Aris Eliades, PhD, RN, CNS, Director, Center for Excellence in Nursing Education and Research, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: aeliades@chmca.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Nursing programs face significant challenges expanding student capacity to meet projected demands for nurses. Qualified applicants are denied admission to entry level nursing programs due to lack of clinical placement sites and classroom space, budget cuts and a national nurse faculty shortage. Many schools are increasing faculty recruitment and retention efforts but face challenges related to competing against higher salaries, benefits and retirement plans of the practice arena. Faculty shortages in areas of nursing specialization such as pediatric nursing have been an area of concern since before the turn the century. An evidence-based, innovative, facility-based Clinical Instructor Program was created to address pediatric clinical faculty shortages and enhance strategic partnerships between the children's hospital and 26 affiliated nursing programs using the setting as a primary pediatric clinical training site. The program improves nursing education capacity with the ultimate goal of impacting the on-going nursing shortage. Affiliated nursing programs contract with the Clinical Instructor Program to provide a pediatric clinical instructor. The Coordinator of the Clinical Instructor Program serves as a shared educational change agent in the liaison role between the hospital and affiliated schools of nursing. Benefits for students, affiliated nursing programs and the healthcare organization are identified. Since the program's inception in March 2008, the Clinical Instructor Program has provided 1800 hours of clinical instruction for 361 students in 37 clinical rotations from seven affiliated nursing programs.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAddressing Pediatric Clinical Faculty Shortages: An Innovative, Facility-Based Clinical Instructor Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEliades, Arisen_US
dc.author.detailsAris Eliades, PhD, RN, CNS, Director, Center for Excellence in Nursing Education and Research, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: aeliades@chmca.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182157-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Nursing programs face significant challenges expanding student capacity to meet projected demands for nurses. Qualified applicants are denied admission to entry level nursing programs due to lack of clinical placement sites and classroom space, budget cuts and a national nurse faculty shortage. Many schools are increasing faculty recruitment and retention efforts but face challenges related to competing against higher salaries, benefits and retirement plans of the practice arena. Faculty shortages in areas of nursing specialization such as pediatric nursing have been an area of concern since before the turn the century. An evidence-based, innovative, facility-based Clinical Instructor Program was created to address pediatric clinical faculty shortages and enhance strategic partnerships between the children's hospital and 26 affiliated nursing programs using the setting as a primary pediatric clinical training site. The program improves nursing education capacity with the ultimate goal of impacting the on-going nursing shortage. Affiliated nursing programs contract with the Clinical Instructor Program to provide a pediatric clinical instructor. The Coordinator of the Clinical Instructor Program serves as a shared educational change agent in the liaison role between the hospital and affiliated schools of nursing. Benefits for students, affiliated nursing programs and the healthcare organization are identified. Since the program's inception in March 2008, the Clinical Instructor Program has provided 1800 hours of clinical instruction for 361 students in 37 clinical rotations from seven affiliated nursing programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:11:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:11:41Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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