24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182173
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Team Rounding: Preventing Patient Falls on the Oncology Unit
Author(s):
Haight, Tanya
Author Details:
Tanya Haight, RN, OCN, CMSRN, ONC, Nurse Clinician, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: tanya.haight@providence.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Among patients with cancer, the risk of falls increases as activities of daily living are negatively impacted. This can occur as a result of the disease process itself and of cancer treatment. Older adults undergoing cancer treatment have a significantly higher risk and occurrence of falls as compared to oncology patients not undergoing cancer treatment. Root causes as related to caregiver communication issues and environment of care were identified. The Rounding Team was comprised of the Oncology/Medical-Surgical staff. The Team observed the patient, the room environment and assessed the patient for the Three Ps (pain, potty and positioning). Lead nurses provided weekly feedback on a designated form and offered suggestions for improvement. Based on this feedback Team Rounding was scheduled every two hours during day shift and every hour during night shift. After 45 days the Team Rounding pilot study was anonymously evaluated by the Oncology/Medical-Surgical staff using a four point Likert Scale measuring six elements pre and post implementation. Staff compliance with Team Rounding was 100%. Team Rounding increased general awareness of patients at increased risk for falls, unit acuity and individual patient needs, in addition to preventing actual patient falls. Patient satisfaction scores increased and falls decreased 80% over the course of the study and 65% for six months afterwards. Because of the significant reduction in falls on the Oncology unit, Team Rounding was successfully implemented hospital-wide. Team Rounding provided the added benefits of improved interdisplinary communication, safe nursing practice and quality patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeam Rounding: Preventing Patient Falls on the Oncology Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaight, Tanyaen_US
dc.author.detailsTanya Haight, RN, OCN, CMSRN, ONC, Nurse Clinician, Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, California, USA, email: tanya.haight@providence.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182173-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Among patients with cancer, the risk of falls increases as activities of daily living are negatively impacted. This can occur as a result of the disease process itself and of cancer treatment. Older adults undergoing cancer treatment have a significantly higher risk and occurrence of falls as compared to oncology patients not undergoing cancer treatment. Root causes as related to caregiver communication issues and environment of care were identified. The Rounding Team was comprised of the Oncology/Medical-Surgical staff. The Team observed the patient, the room environment and assessed the patient for the Three Ps (pain, potty and positioning). Lead nurses provided weekly feedback on a designated form and offered suggestions for improvement. Based on this feedback Team Rounding was scheduled every two hours during day shift and every hour during night shift. After 45 days the Team Rounding pilot study was anonymously evaluated by the Oncology/Medical-Surgical staff using a four point Likert Scale measuring six elements pre and post implementation. Staff compliance with Team Rounding was 100%. Team Rounding increased general awareness of patients at increased risk for falls, unit acuity and individual patient needs, in addition to preventing actual patient falls. Patient satisfaction scores increased and falls decreased 80% over the course of the study and 65% for six months afterwards. Because of the significant reduction in falls on the Oncology unit, Team Rounding was successfully implemented hospital-wide. Team Rounding provided the added benefits of improved interdisplinary communication, safe nursing practice and quality patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:12:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:12:25Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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