2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182177
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Successful Interventions with Disruptive Physicians
Author(s):
Hardy-Sprenkle, Valerie
Author Details:
Valerie Hardy-Sprenkle, MPH, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, Vice-President Patient Care Services, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vhardy@wellspan.org
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The Office of the President, VPMA and MEC of this 572 community teaching hospital developed and implemented a successful Disruptive Physician Policy in 1996. This Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference« presentation will describe specific steps in the policy and its application in actual situations reported by clinical nursing staff and nursing leadership. Key steps include: 1) discussion - Dept. Chair; 2) collegial conversation-VPMA; 3) appearance before MEC/ held accountable by peers; 4) written agreement; 5) referral to outside resource/program; 6) suspension; 7) termination. Of particular innovation, is the step when the physician gets mid-way through the counseling process and appropriate behavior change has not occurred. Non-traditional interventions include referring to 1) state physicians health program for evaluation, 2) the PULSE program (Physician Universal Leadership Skills Education), 3) Center for Professional Well-Being; 4) State Medical Society. The PULSE program included 1:1 counseling from an outside MD and a total of 75 requests for quarterly 360 electronic feedback from MDs, RNs, nursing leadership and administration, for a period of 2 years. The feedback questions were individualized for the MDs specific problematic behaviors. RNs were heartened to be included in providing feedback. Another innovation is VPMA or Administrative Director personally interviewing multiple RNs to obtain a comprehensive picture. Metrics for success include: Collegial Conversations 18; MEC accountability/appearance 4; state health program/ PULSE/ MD psychologist 13; suspension /termination -7. Nursing staff has increased trust and confidence in senior physician and nursing leadership due to results (changed behavior/ MDs terminated). RN identification/ reporting of problematic behavior now occurs earlier due to achieving noticeable results.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSuccessful Interventions with Disruptive Physiciansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHardy-Sprenkle, Valerieen_US
dc.author.detailsValerie Hardy-Sprenkle, MPH, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE, Vice-President Patient Care Services, York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania, USA, email: vhardy@wellspan.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182177-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: The Office of the President, VPMA and MEC of this 572 community teaching hospital developed and implemented a successful Disruptive Physician Policy in 1996. This Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference« presentation will describe specific steps in the policy and its application in actual situations reported by clinical nursing staff and nursing leadership. Key steps include: 1) discussion - Dept. Chair; 2) collegial conversation-VPMA; 3) appearance before MEC/ held accountable by peers; 4) written agreement; 5) referral to outside resource/program; 6) suspension; 7) termination. Of particular innovation, is the step when the physician gets mid-way through the counseling process and appropriate behavior change has not occurred. Non-traditional interventions include referring to 1) state physicians health program for evaluation, 2) the PULSE program (Physician Universal Leadership Skills Education), 3) Center for Professional Well-Being; 4) State Medical Society. The PULSE program included 1:1 counseling from an outside MD and a total of 75 requests for quarterly 360 electronic feedback from MDs, RNs, nursing leadership and administration, for a period of 2 years. The feedback questions were individualized for the MDs specific problematic behaviors. RNs were heartened to be included in providing feedback. Another innovation is VPMA or Administrative Director personally interviewing multiple RNs to obtain a comprehensive picture. Metrics for success include: Collegial Conversations 18; MEC accountability/appearance 4; state health program/ PULSE/ MD psychologist 13; suspension /termination -7. Nursing staff has increased trust and confidence in senior physician and nursing leadership due to results (changed behavior/ MDs terminated). RN identification/ reporting of problematic behavior now occurs earlier due to achieving noticeable results.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:12:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:12:36Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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