Improving Pain Management for Children with Cognitive Impairment: An Evidence-Based Practice Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182184
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Pain Management for Children with Cognitive Impairment: An Evidence-Based Practice Project
Author(s):
Holtzer, Brenda
Author Details:
Brenda Holtzer, PhD, RN, Clinical Specialist, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: holtzer@email.chop.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Undertreatment of pain in children unable to self-report has been well documented citing issues such as difficulty interpreting pain behaviors and the influence of attitudes and beliefs of health care providers on that interpretation. We initiated a quality improvement project to improve pain management for children with cognitive impairment (CI). An extensive literature review and synthesis identified two pain assessment tools (Pediatric Pain Profile, PPP & revised FLACC scale) with adequate reliability and validity. Each tool is designed to include parent input in the pain assessment process. Parents from the hospital Family Advisory Council reviewed the tools and provided input about their effectiveness. The tools were then tested on 2 inpatient units for clinical utility and specificity. A total of 133 RN and 20 parent questionnaires based on pain assessments of 30 children with CI were obtained from the clinical pilot. A majority of nurses (74%) preferred the rFLACC while 54% of parents preferred the PPP. The rFLACC scale was superior to the PPP for reported usefulness of the tool and helpfulness of the pain descriptors as indicated by both parents and nurses. Data from the clinical pilot and evidence based review support the addition of the rFLACC scale to the hospital pain management policy. The hospital pain policy was modified in September, 2009 to include the rFLACC tool. Successful strategies used to communicate and implement this change in practice such as a nursing grand rounds, education through the professional practice model and unit based pain champions will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Pain Management for Children with Cognitive Impairment: An Evidence-Based Practice Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoltzer, Brendaen_US
dc.author.detailsBrenda Holtzer, PhD, RN, Clinical Specialist, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: holtzer@email.chop.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182184-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Undertreatment of pain in children unable to self-report has been well documented citing issues such as difficulty interpreting pain behaviors and the influence of attitudes and beliefs of health care providers on that interpretation. We initiated a quality improvement project to improve pain management for children with cognitive impairment (CI). An extensive literature review and synthesis identified two pain assessment tools (Pediatric Pain Profile, PPP & revised FLACC scale) with adequate reliability and validity. Each tool is designed to include parent input in the pain assessment process. Parents from the hospital Family Advisory Council reviewed the tools and provided input about their effectiveness. The tools were then tested on 2 inpatient units for clinical utility and specificity. A total of 133 RN and 20 parent questionnaires based on pain assessments of 30 children with CI were obtained from the clinical pilot. A majority of nurses (74%) preferred the rFLACC while 54% of parents preferred the PPP. The rFLACC scale was superior to the PPP for reported usefulness of the tool and helpfulness of the pain descriptors as indicated by both parents and nurses. Data from the clinical pilot and evidence based review support the addition of the rFLACC scale to the hospital pain management policy. The hospital pain policy was modified in September, 2009 to include the rFLACC tool. Successful strategies used to communicate and implement this change in practice such as a nursing grand rounds, education through the professional practice model and unit based pain champions will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:12:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:12:54Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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