2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182190
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Driven Innovations to Improve Care of Perioperative Patients
Author(s):
Johnson, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Johnson, PhD, RN, Director, Research and Evidence-Based Practice, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: kjohnson8@umm.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: This session will illustrate how nurses at Magnet hospitals are empowered to address clinical problems using innovative strategies, based on research and evidence-based practice (EBP), to improve patient outcomes. Perioperative nurses at our organization were confronted with three on-going problems that jeopardized patient safety: (1) inability to maintain normothermia throughout the entire perioperative period, (2) inconsistent methods to measure temperature throughout all phases of the perioperative period and (3) the inability to identify patients with high risk of having obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) preoperatively resulting in an increase in post anesthesia care unit (PACU) length of stay and unplanned hospital admissions. Nurses in the operating room used EBP methods to implement a preoperative warming protocol that resulted in increased patient satisfaction and perioperative normothermia. Staff nurses and nurse anesthetists in the PACU conducted a research study to determine the accuracy and precision of temporal artery temperature (TAT) measurements as a method to measure core body temperature. Results revealed that TAT measurements had a bias of 0.2C and precision of 0.7C. Limits of agreement (-1.19 and 1.59C) revealed that TAT agreed with esophageal temperature measurements as a method to measure core body temperature. A team of nurses in the PACU developed an EBP protocol to preoperatively identify patients at risk for developing OSA-related complications and to guide decision making for determining safe and appropriate disposition of patients postoperatively. This EBP protocol resulted in decreased PACU length of stay and unplanned hospital admissions for patients with high risk of undiagnosed OSA.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Driven Innovations to Improve Care of Perioperative Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Johnson, PhD, RN, Director, Research and Evidence-Based Practice, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: kjohnson8@umm.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182190-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: This session will illustrate how nurses at Magnet hospitals are empowered to address clinical problems using innovative strategies, based on research and evidence-based practice (EBP), to improve patient outcomes. Perioperative nurses at our organization were confronted with three on-going problems that jeopardized patient safety: (1) inability to maintain normothermia throughout the entire perioperative period, (2) inconsistent methods to measure temperature throughout all phases of the perioperative period and (3) the inability to identify patients with high risk of having obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) preoperatively resulting in an increase in post anesthesia care unit (PACU) length of stay and unplanned hospital admissions. Nurses in the operating room used EBP methods to implement a preoperative warming protocol that resulted in increased patient satisfaction and perioperative normothermia. Staff nurses and nurse anesthetists in the PACU conducted a research study to determine the accuracy and precision of temporal artery temperature (TAT) measurements as a method to measure core body temperature. Results revealed that TAT measurements had a bias of 0.2C and precision of 0.7C. Limits of agreement (-1.19 and 1.59C) revealed that TAT agreed with esophageal temperature measurements as a method to measure core body temperature. A team of nurses in the PACU developed an EBP protocol to preoperatively identify patients at risk for developing OSA-related complications and to guide decision making for determining safe and appropriate disposition of patients postoperatively. This EBP protocol resulted in decreased PACU length of stay and unplanned hospital admissions for patients with high risk of undiagnosed OSA.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:13:10Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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