2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182199
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Falls Among Ambulatory Psychiatric Inpatients: Causes and Prevention
Author(s):
Karcher, David
Author Details:
David Karcher, BA, RN-BC, Service Line Nurse Manager, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: karcherd@cshs.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Researchable Question 1) What are the causes of falls among this population? 2) What can be done to prevent or reduce falls? Methods Cycle 1: Plan: Do an in depth analysis of falls data from MIDAS for the past 6 mos. Do: Review data with a Falls Task Force. Develop and implement a prevention plan based on findings. Study: Review data after implementation. Act: Share the effectiveness of the individualized Fall Prevention Plan and reinforce continued implementation. Conclusions An analysis of the falls revealed a complex picture. Our patients are all expected to be ambulatory and to participate in groups and activities in a common room. At the same time, we are administering to them medications that are known to cause falls. They may have a poor PO intake due to a lack of appetite. They may be confused, forgetful or distracted or have poor judgment. The analysis also revealed that 96% of the falls occurred in patients with concurrent medical problems. The medications they take for these conditions interact with the medications we give them for their psychiatric condition and make them particularly vulnerable. As a result of these complex factors, it was determined that an individualized approach is needed. We adapted a Fall Prevention Plan that had been developed by the Falls Committee several years ago and made it specific for our patients needs. It is printed on orange paper and posted at the head of the bed. The plan focuses on education and the need for all staff to share accountability.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFalls Among Ambulatory Psychiatric Inpatients: Causes and Preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKarcher, Daviden_US
dc.author.detailsDavid Karcher, BA, RN-BC, Service Line Nurse Manager, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: karcherd@cshs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182199-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Researchable Question 1) What are the causes of falls among this population? 2) What can be done to prevent or reduce falls? Methods Cycle 1: Plan: Do an in depth analysis of falls data from MIDAS for the past 6 mos. Do: Review data with a Falls Task Force. Develop and implement a prevention plan based on findings. Study: Review data after implementation. Act: Share the effectiveness of the individualized Fall Prevention Plan and reinforce continued implementation. Conclusions An analysis of the falls revealed a complex picture. Our patients are all expected to be ambulatory and to participate in groups and activities in a common room. At the same time, we are administering to them medications that are known to cause falls. They may have a poor PO intake due to a lack of appetite. They may be confused, forgetful or distracted or have poor judgment. The analysis also revealed that 96% of the falls occurred in patients with concurrent medical problems. The medications they take for these conditions interact with the medications we give them for their psychiatric condition and make them particularly vulnerable. As a result of these complex factors, it was determined that an individualized approach is needed. We adapted a Fall Prevention Plan that had been developed by the Falls Committee several years ago and made it specific for our patients needs. It is printed on orange paper and posted at the head of the bed. The plan focuses on education and the need for all staff to share accountability.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:13:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:13:34Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.