2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182202
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Structured Discharge Education Plan on Pneumonia Readmission Rates
Author(s):
Kelly, Leisa
Author Details:
Leisa Kelly, MS, APRN, CNS, CEN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, email: lkelly@ololrmc.com
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Hospital readmission rates secondary to pneumonia are problematic. While our hospital readmission rate for adult pneumonia was 19.6%, better than the national average, we wanted to promote a zero defect process. In January 2009, we commissioned a nurse led multidisciplinary pneumonia team to decrease the all cause readmission rate. The project aim was to decrease readmits from 19.6% to 10% over a 12 month period. Initially, we developed a tool to equip the bedside nurse and clinician to: 1) facilitate patient understanding of discharge instructions (i.e. medication, activity, worsening symptoms) and 2) determine clinical stability for discharge. The tool was reviewed with the patient daily, knowledge related to each criterion was assessed, and comprehension was identified based on the premise of a traffic signal. The red light meant the patient had multiple questions and needed a better understanding of the medical needs or condition. The green light meant the patient fully understood and had no questions about self-management at home. The instrument was piloted on five inpatient medical units. A pharmacy decision matrix was developed by the pharmacist for the most prescribed antibiotics, which provided additional administration information for the nurse (i.e. milk products affect effectiveness). Over an eleven month period, pneumonia readmission rate for all causes dropped to 7.8% with a clinical stability for discharge at 95%. Next steps include expanding the pilot to all adult pneumonia patients and working with information systems to automate a patient list and a nurse task for patient education.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Structured Discharge Education Plan on Pneumonia Readmission Ratesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Leisaen_US
dc.author.detailsLeisa Kelly, MS, APRN, CNS, CEN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA, email: lkelly@ololrmc.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182202-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Hospital readmission rates secondary to pneumonia are problematic. While our hospital readmission rate for adult pneumonia was 19.6%, better than the national average, we wanted to promote a zero defect process. In January 2009, we commissioned a nurse led multidisciplinary pneumonia team to decrease the all cause readmission rate. The project aim was to decrease readmits from 19.6% to 10% over a 12 month period. Initially, we developed a tool to equip the bedside nurse and clinician to: 1) facilitate patient understanding of discharge instructions (i.e. medication, activity, worsening symptoms) and 2) determine clinical stability for discharge. The tool was reviewed with the patient daily, knowledge related to each criterion was assessed, and comprehension was identified based on the premise of a traffic signal. The red light meant the patient had multiple questions and needed a better understanding of the medical needs or condition. The green light meant the patient fully understood and had no questions about self-management at home. The instrument was piloted on five inpatient medical units. A pharmacy decision matrix was developed by the pharmacist for the most prescribed antibiotics, which provided additional administration information for the nurse (i.e. milk products affect effectiveness). Over an eleven month period, pneumonia readmission rate for all causes dropped to 7.8% with a clinical stability for discharge at 95%. Next steps include expanding the pilot to all adult pneumonia patients and working with information systems to automate a patient list and a nurse task for patient education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:13:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:13:41Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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