2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182209
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Raise the Bar and Lower the Temperature with Therapeutic Hypothermia
Author(s):
Koran, Zeb
Author Details:
Zeb Koran, RN, MSN, APRN, DNP, Director of Professional Practice, Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, Illinois, USA, email: zkoran@nch.org
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcomes in patients who have experienced cardiopulmonary arrest. The first two studies to demonstrate this were Bernard et al. and The Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest Study Group. Both of these studies were published in 2002 and numerous studies have followed to further expand the concept. Studies are also being conducted to expand the usage of therapeutic hypothermia. Some of the diagnoses being investigated to determine if therapeutic hypothermia is advantageous includes traumatic brain injury, liver failure, ischemic stroke, and severe ARDS (Varon & Acosta, 2008). Therapeutic hypothermia is an important concept for institutions to consider in an effort to prevent some of the negative outcomes that occur as a result of the initial insult and/or the compensatory mechanisms triggered in response to the insult. After an extensive review of the literature, our mid-sized hospital developed and implemented a therapeutic hypothermia protocol for the post-resuscitation patient. Since its implementation, we have continued to monitor protocol compliance, keep current with the literature, and review patient outcomes. In an effort to assist other hospitals, we would like to share the process of creating an evidence based protocol for therapeutic hypothermia, the challenges and lessons learned in making the program successful, data collection for monitoring its success, our next steps, and some case scenarios. The value of therapeutic hypothermia continues to grow and is a concept that those institutions who want to raise the bar in their level of care will want to implement.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRaise the Bar and Lower the Temperature with Therapeutic Hypothermiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKoran, Zeben_US
dc.author.detailsZeb Koran, RN, MSN, APRN, DNP, Director of Professional Practice, Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, Illinois, USA, email: zkoran@nch.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182209-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Therapeutic hypothermia has been shown to improve outcomes in patients who have experienced cardiopulmonary arrest. The first two studies to demonstrate this were Bernard et al. and The Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest Study Group. Both of these studies were published in 2002 and numerous studies have followed to further expand the concept. Studies are also being conducted to expand the usage of therapeutic hypothermia. Some of the diagnoses being investigated to determine if therapeutic hypothermia is advantageous includes traumatic brain injury, liver failure, ischemic stroke, and severe ARDS (Varon & Acosta, 2008). Therapeutic hypothermia is an important concept for institutions to consider in an effort to prevent some of the negative outcomes that occur as a result of the initial insult and/or the compensatory mechanisms triggered in response to the insult. After an extensive review of the literature, our mid-sized hospital developed and implemented a therapeutic hypothermia protocol for the post-resuscitation patient. Since its implementation, we have continued to monitor protocol compliance, keep current with the literature, and review patient outcomes. In an effort to assist other hospitals, we would like to share the process of creating an evidence based protocol for therapeutic hypothermia, the challenges and lessons learned in making the program successful, data collection for monitoring its success, our next steps, and some case scenarios. The value of therapeutic hypothermia continues to grow and is a concept that those institutions who want to raise the bar in their level of care will want to implement.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:13:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:13:59Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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