2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182218
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Driving High Performance Nursing Care through Work Culture Improvement
Author(s):
Lovelace, Rhonda
Author Details:
Rhonda Lovelace, RN, BSN, Nurse Manager Operations, Durham Regional Hospital/Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: rhonda.lovelace@duke.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background and description: There is a growing consensus that workplace effectiveness is essential for the delivery of high quality, patient-centered nursing care (1). Moreover, a breakdown in team work communication among health care team members is seen as a preliminary reason for medical errors (2). This abstract details a comprehensive nurse-driven work culture improvement process undertaken on a medical-surgical clinical unit of a community hospital, and highlights the workplace and patient care outcomes of this successful initiative. Method: A. One-on-one interviews with Unit leadership, staff and physicians B. Presentation of assessment results and suggested interventions C. Implementing a Work Council to identify and implement strategic action priorities D. Data collection and measurement The process was designed to identify challenges to the work culture and strategies to facilitate staff buy-in to a new paradigm of nursing care delivery that emphasizes collaboration and teamwork as a core competency and critical skill set. The goal was to convince staff that internalizing this paradigm and building this skill set is necessary to meet operational and clinical quality expectations and deal effectively with 21st century demands of highly technical and patient-centered nursing care. Interventions completed include: implementation of a Work Council; customized mandatory TeamSTEPPS training. Interventions in the pipeline: workshops on giving and receiving feedback; conflict resolution; diversity divides (generational, nationality, communication and culture); revising training protocol for current and future charge nurses. Results: Outcomes tracked include: marked increase in patient satisfaction (54th percentile to 90th percentile, according to Press Gainey); marked increase staff satisfaction (up 11%); marked decrease staff turnover (down 25%).
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDriving High Performance Nursing Care through Work Culture Improvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLovelace, Rhondaen_US
dc.author.detailsRhonda Lovelace, RN, BSN, Nurse Manager Operations, Durham Regional Hospital/Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: rhonda.lovelace@duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182218-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background and description: There is a growing consensus that workplace effectiveness is essential for the delivery of high quality, patient-centered nursing care (1). Moreover, a breakdown in team work communication among health care team members is seen as a preliminary reason for medical errors (2). This abstract details a comprehensive nurse-driven work culture improvement process undertaken on a medical-surgical clinical unit of a community hospital, and highlights the workplace and patient care outcomes of this successful initiative. Method: A. One-on-one interviews with Unit leadership, staff and physicians B. Presentation of assessment results and suggested interventions C. Implementing a Work Council to identify and implement strategic action priorities D. Data collection and measurement The process was designed to identify challenges to the work culture and strategies to facilitate staff buy-in to a new paradigm of nursing care delivery that emphasizes collaboration and teamwork as a core competency and critical skill set. The goal was to convince staff that internalizing this paradigm and building this skill set is necessary to meet operational and clinical quality expectations and deal effectively with 21st century demands of highly technical and patient-centered nursing care. Interventions completed include: implementation of a Work Council; customized mandatory TeamSTEPPS training. Interventions in the pipeline: workshops on giving and receiving feedback; conflict resolution; diversity divides (generational, nationality, communication and culture); revising training protocol for current and future charge nurses. Results: Outcomes tracked include: marked increase in patient satisfaction (54th percentile to 90th percentile, according to Press Gainey); marked increase staff satisfaction (up 11%); marked decrease staff turnover (down 25%).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:23Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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