2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182222
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Collaborative Research Partnerships to Improve Urban Women's Health
Author(s):
Mack-Brooks, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Mack-Brooks, MSN, CRNP, Director Nursing Community Outreach, Hospital of the University of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mackbp@uphs.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference The health of an urban community (UC) where this academic medical center (AMC) and School of Nursing (SON) are located continues to lag behind that of our city and country. In 2007, infant mortality rate in this UC was 15.6 %, compared to 11.5% in the city at-large and 6.7% nationally. In UC, the leading cause of death is heart disease and cancer related to underlying risk factors of smoking, asthma, and late cancer screening. To address these health disparities, a partnership with UC, AMC and SON was established. This community collaborative research partnership provided the foundation for a comprehensive approach to health care prevention strategies that are effective in terms of service delivery, behavior change outcomes, and community impact. This partnership ensures that evidenced-based interventions are sustainable and reach the UC. Building on the community nursing paradigm, focus groups were conducted with UCC women to determine their health learning needs. Guided by the Donabedian Model (1966), structures and processes were established to provide health promotion education within the community. Structures established included: 1) UC women's board, 2) AMC & SON nursing boards, 3) Key stake holder community board. Processes included securing funding for teaching module development based on learning needs identified during the focus groups in conjunction with the UC morbidity and mortality indicators. Health promotion outcomes between September 2008 to June 2009, health promotion outcomes included Women's Shelter and faith based community partnerships, 15 health fairs reaching 50-1000 residents/event with 2-65 nurses and 6-15 student nurse educators/event.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Collaborative Research Partnerships to Improve Urban Women's Healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMack-Brooks, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Mack-Brooks, MSN, CRNP, Director Nursing Community Outreach, Hospital of the University of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mackbp@uphs.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182222-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference The health of an urban community (UC) where this academic medical center (AMC) and School of Nursing (SON) are located continues to lag behind that of our city and country. In 2007, infant mortality rate in this UC was 15.6 %, compared to 11.5% in the city at-large and 6.7% nationally. In UC, the leading cause of death is heart disease and cancer related to underlying risk factors of smoking, asthma, and late cancer screening. To address these health disparities, a partnership with UC, AMC and SON was established. This community collaborative research partnership provided the foundation for a comprehensive approach to health care prevention strategies that are effective in terms of service delivery, behavior change outcomes, and community impact. This partnership ensures that evidenced-based interventions are sustainable and reach the UC. Building on the community nursing paradigm, focus groups were conducted with UCC women to determine their health learning needs. Guided by the Donabedian Model (1966), structures and processes were established to provide health promotion education within the community. Structures established included: 1) UC women's board, 2) AMC & SON nursing boards, 3) Key stake holder community board. Processes included securing funding for teaching module development based on learning needs identified during the focus groups in conjunction with the UC morbidity and mortality indicators. Health promotion outcomes between September 2008 to June 2009, health promotion outcomes included Women's Shelter and faith based community partnerships, 15 health fairs reaching 50-1000 residents/event with 2-65 nurses and 6-15 student nurse educators/event.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:33Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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