2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182225
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reduction in Hospital Acquired MRSA and VRE Infections Through Active Surveillance Cultures
Author(s):
Maschmeier, Cynthia
Author Details:
Cynthia Maschmeier, MT (ASCP) SM, CIC, Infection Preventionist, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: cmaschmeier@umcaz.edu
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Issue: The incidence of multi-drug resistant organism infections has been increasing resulting in longer patient stays, poorer patient outcomes, and increased costs to the patient and hospital. A gradual increase in hospital acquired infections was observed in our facility. Our goal was to decrease methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) transmission rates through the use of surveillance cultures. Project: Our hospital implemented an active surveillance policy to identify patients with MRSA and VRE colonization. Our intensive care units (excluding the NICU) and an adult medicine unit were determined to be areas for improvement. A patient admitted to one of these locations had nasal and rectal swabs collected within 24 hours of admission. Universal gloving is used until the culture results are available. Any patient with a positive culture is put on contact precautions. Results: One year after initiation of the active surveillance policy, our institution had a 49% reduction in hospital acquired MRSA infections and 18.5% reduction in hospital acquired VRE. The estimated cost avoidance to the facility was $759,707. Lessons Learned: Active surveillance cultures were an effective method of reducing the incidence of hospital acquired MRSA in our institution. While a slight reduction in VRE rates was observed, our infection prevention committee considered the impact of VRE culturing minimal and routine surveillance was discontinued after one year.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReduction in Hospital Acquired MRSA and VRE Infections Through Active Surveillance Culturesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaschmeier, Cynthiaen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Maschmeier, MT (ASCP) SM, CIC, Infection Preventionist, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: cmaschmeier@umcaz.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182225-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Issue: The incidence of multi-drug resistant organism infections has been increasing resulting in longer patient stays, poorer patient outcomes, and increased costs to the patient and hospital. A gradual increase in hospital acquired infections was observed in our facility. Our goal was to decrease methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) transmission rates through the use of surveillance cultures. Project: Our hospital implemented an active surveillance policy to identify patients with MRSA and VRE colonization. Our intensive care units (excluding the NICU) and an adult medicine unit were determined to be areas for improvement. A patient admitted to one of these locations had nasal and rectal swabs collected within 24 hours of admission. Universal gloving is used until the culture results are available. Any patient with a positive culture is put on contact precautions. Results: One year after initiation of the active surveillance policy, our institution had a 49% reduction in hospital acquired MRSA infections and 18.5% reduction in hospital acquired VRE. The estimated cost avoidance to the facility was $759,707. Lessons Learned: Active surveillance cultures were an effective method of reducing the incidence of hospital acquired MRSA in our institution. While a slight reduction in VRE rates was observed, our infection prevention committee considered the impact of VRE culturing minimal and routine surveillance was discontinued after one year.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:41Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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