2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182227
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recognition of Anxiety and Depression in High-Risk Pregnant Hospitalized Women
Author(s):
Mau, Kari
Author Details:
Kari Mau, RN-BC, DNP, WHNP-BC, Nurse Practitioner, Scottsdale Healthcare- Shea, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, email: kmau@shc.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: By the year 2020, it is expected that depression will be second only to heart disease as a cause of disability worldwide (Murray, 1997). Despite the increasing recognition of depression after childbirth, it estimated that 80% of anxiety and depression in pregnancy go undiagnosed. (Bennett, Einarson, Taddio, Koren, & Einarson, 2004). For most women, there is a continuum of anxiety and depressive symptoms that extend from pregnancy through the postnatal period. Identification of women who are at high risk for depression is the first step in preventing its devastating and long-lasting effects on families (Beck, Records, & Rice, 2006). It would be ideal to assess for anxiety and depression during pregnancy, especially in those women who have a high-risk pregnancy. For those women who have a screening score that may indicate anxiety and depression, early and timely referral into social support programs would be essential (Dunn, Handley, & Shelton, 2007). In this project, an assessment of anxiety and depression was undertaken in pregnant women who were hospitalized for a pregnancy-related complication at a community hospital in the southwest United States. Although the sample was small, this project contributed to existing research that anxiety and depression are prevalent in patients faced with a high-risk pregnancy. In fact, screening indicated that symptoms anxiety was more common than depressive symptoms. The demographical analyses also revealed that symptoms of anxiety and depression exist in higher socio-economic, married women. This project contributed to the growing evidence on perinatal mood disorders in pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecognition of Anxiety and Depression in High-Risk Pregnant Hospitalized Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMau, Karien_US
dc.author.detailsKari Mau, RN-BC, DNP, WHNP-BC, Nurse Practitioner, Scottsdale Healthcare- Shea, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA, email: kmau@shc.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182227-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: By the year 2020, it is expected that depression will be second only to heart disease as a cause of disability worldwide (Murray, 1997). Despite the increasing recognition of depression after childbirth, it estimated that 80% of anxiety and depression in pregnancy go undiagnosed. (Bennett, Einarson, Taddio, Koren, & Einarson, 2004). For most women, there is a continuum of anxiety and depressive symptoms that extend from pregnancy through the postnatal period. Identification of women who are at high risk for depression is the first step in preventing its devastating and long-lasting effects on families (Beck, Records, & Rice, 2006). It would be ideal to assess for anxiety and depression during pregnancy, especially in those women who have a high-risk pregnancy. For those women who have a screening score that may indicate anxiety and depression, early and timely referral into social support programs would be essential (Dunn, Handley, & Shelton, 2007). In this project, an assessment of anxiety and depression was undertaken in pregnant women who were hospitalized for a pregnancy-related complication at a community hospital in the southwest United States. Although the sample was small, this project contributed to existing research that anxiety and depression are prevalent in patients faced with a high-risk pregnancy. In fact, screening indicated that symptoms anxiety was more common than depressive symptoms. The demographical analyses also revealed that symptoms of anxiety and depression exist in higher socio-economic, married women. This project contributed to the growing evidence on perinatal mood disorders in pregnancy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:46Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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