2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182230
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decreasing Catheter-Associated Blood Stream Infections: Nurses to the Rescue
Author(s):
McCaskey, Marjorie
Author Details:
Marjorie McCaskey, RN, MSN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Pediatric Critical Care, Clarian Health Partners, Inc, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mmccaske@clarian.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI) have emerged as a significant source of morbidity, mortality and unintended medical costs to hospitalized adult and pediatric patients (1-3). With a CA-BSI rate in the intensive care unit of 7.9 infections per 1000 central line days, nearly two and one-half times the national average, our hospital recognized the need to prioritize this quality initiative. A large education program alone produced only minimal and temporary improvement (4). A central line team developed by and for the bedside nurses has proven to be the most effective outcomes improvement initiative for this high volume ICU. Role responsibilities of this team include reliable daily assessment of all central venous access, routine and as needed interventions of all central line dressing changes and heightened awareness of the implications of central access and CA-BSI through real-time education for their nurse colleagues, the resident physicians and the patient or family. By providing consistent communication between the medical team and the bedside, and serving as an advocate for best practice, this team of nurses has demonstrate a successful change in culture from a we-they mentality to a collaborative effort to decrease CA-BSI (5-6). In the eighteen months since the implementation of this team, the year-to-date CA-BSI rate in the ICU has decreased to 1.3 infections per 1000 line days and plans are underway to spread this collaborative methodology to other areas of the hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecreasing Catheter-Associated Blood Stream Infections: Nurses to the Rescueen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCaskey, Marjorieen_US
dc.author.detailsMarjorie McCaskey, RN, MSN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Pediatric Critical Care, Clarian Health Partners, Inc, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mmccaske@clarian.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182230-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI) have emerged as a significant source of morbidity, mortality and unintended medical costs to hospitalized adult and pediatric patients (1-3). With a CA-BSI rate in the intensive care unit of 7.9 infections per 1000 central line days, nearly two and one-half times the national average, our hospital recognized the need to prioritize this quality initiative. A large education program alone produced only minimal and temporary improvement (4). A central line team developed by and for the bedside nurses has proven to be the most effective outcomes improvement initiative for this high volume ICU. Role responsibilities of this team include reliable daily assessment of all central venous access, routine and as needed interventions of all central line dressing changes and heightened awareness of the implications of central access and CA-BSI through real-time education for their nurse colleagues, the resident physicians and the patient or family. By providing consistent communication between the medical team and the bedside, and serving as an advocate for best practice, this team of nurses has demonstrate a successful change in culture from a we-they mentality to a collaborative effort to decrease CA-BSI (5-6). In the eighteen months since the implementation of this team, the year-to-date CA-BSI rate in the ICU has decreased to 1.3 infections per 1000 line days and plans are underway to spread this collaborative methodology to other areas of the hospital.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:54Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.