2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182231
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Fatigue: Implications for Professional Practice and Patient Safety
Author(s):
McDermott, Sandi
Author Details:
Sandi McDermott, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, Vice President Nursing, Medical Center of Arlington, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: sandi.mcdermott@hcahealthcare.com
Abstract:
Podium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background/Significance: The effects of fatigue are known to cause a lack of mental clarity, difficulty concentrating, and in some cases, memory loss. Nurses working nights and rotating shifts (and/or frequent overtime hours) often do not get enough sleep. Working overtime, whether at the end of a regularly scheduled shift or working more than 40 hours during a week is associated with greater fatigue and an increased risk of making errors (Rogers, 2009). Methods: A statewide survey of CNOs' perceptions regarding nurse fatigue in the workplace was conducted. Findings were used to develop a toolkit containing structure and process standards, interventions and strategies for assessing, preventing, and addressing nurse fatigue in hospital settings. Results: 60 CNOs responded (18% response rate). 93% monitor hours worked by nurses, and 78% monitor nurses' hours via Managers' oversight. 92% do not monitor nurses' hours worked outside the subjects' facilities. 57% believe that nurses should work no more than 16 of 24 hours and 47% believe that maximum time worked in a 7 day period should not exceed 60 hours. 60% have policies in place addressing nurses' fitness for duty. 45% of CNO respondents believe that nurse fatigue has a significant impact on patient safety. Study Implications and Intervention Strategies: A toolkit designed to assess, prevent and monitor workplace fatigue was developed as a guide for nurse leaders and direct care nurses in creating safe work environments for nurses and enhancing patient safety. Conclusion: Preventing nurse fatigue impacts professional practice and patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Fatigue: Implications for Professional Practice and Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Sandien_US
dc.author.detailsSandi McDermott, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, Vice President Nursing, Medical Center of Arlington, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: sandi.mcdermott@hcahealthcare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182231-
dc.description.abstractPodium presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Background/Significance: The effects of fatigue are known to cause a lack of mental clarity, difficulty concentrating, and in some cases, memory loss. Nurses working nights and rotating shifts (and/or frequent overtime hours) often do not get enough sleep. Working overtime, whether at the end of a regularly scheduled shift or working more than 40 hours during a week is associated with greater fatigue and an increased risk of making errors (Rogers, 2009). Methods: A statewide survey of CNOs' perceptions regarding nurse fatigue in the workplace was conducted. Findings were used to develop a toolkit containing structure and process standards, interventions and strategies for assessing, preventing, and addressing nurse fatigue in hospital settings. Results: 60 CNOs responded (18% response rate). 93% monitor hours worked by nurses, and 78% monitor nurses' hours via Managers' oversight. 92% do not monitor nurses' hours worked outside the subjects' facilities. 57% believe that nurses should work no more than 16 of 24 hours and 47% believe that maximum time worked in a 7 day period should not exceed 60 hours. 60% have policies in place addressing nurses' fitness for duty. 45% of CNO respondents believe that nurse fatigue has a significant impact on patient safety. Study Implications and Intervention Strategies: A toolkit designed to assess, prevent and monitor workplace fatigue was developed as a guide for nurse leaders and direct care nurses in creating safe work environments for nurses and enhancing patient safety. Conclusion: Preventing nurse fatigue impacts professional practice and patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:14:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:14:57Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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