2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182233
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BSI... a NEVER EVENT in the ICU
Author(s):
McHenry, Yvette
Author Details:
Yvette McHenry, RN, CCRN, ICU Clinical Data Specialist, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania, USA, email: McHenry_Yvette@guthrie.org
Abstract:
Poster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Blood Stream Infections (BSI) are a leading cause of preventable, infectious complications in critically ill patients with central venous catheters (CVC)that can adversely affect patient outcomes. A rural hospital in Pennsylvania decided to evaluate their CVC insertion and dressing change practice due to unsatisfactory BSI rates. In 2006, ICU nurses and providers came together to initiate a practice change to include the mandatory use of drapes, gowns, gloves and caps during all CVC procedures. Evaluation of this change included staff review and root cause analysis of each BSI. As a result, BSI infections decreased from 13 to 7 per month. This practice improvement was short lived, lasting 12 months, as each provider and nurse was responsible to gather their own supplies. Then, in 2008, through a collaborative approach between the hospitals Nursing Practice and Quality Councils, several evidenced based practice (EBP) strategies were implemented to address the hospitals BSI rate at large. The ICU representatives from these councils, along with the ICU Clinical Nurse Specialist, took the lead to readdress the ICUs BSI rate. Successful EBP strategies in the ICU included the implementation of a CVC insertion and dressing change bundle, adoption of the hospitals policy change to utilize the Biopatch and Chlorhexidine scrub; one on one training for more than 60 registered nurses; ongoing staff evaluation of the bundles; and monthly data review with root cause analysis for each infection. To date, this ICU has been able to sustain a BSI rate of 0.0 for 12 months.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
The 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBSI... a NEVER EVENT in the ICUen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcHenry, Yvetteen_US
dc.author.detailsYvette McHenry, RN, CCRN, ICU Clinical Data Specialist, Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania, USA, email: McHenry_Yvette@guthrie.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182233-
dc.description.abstractPoster presentation, ANCC National Magnet Conference: Blood Stream Infections (BSI) are a leading cause of preventable, infectious complications in critically ill patients with central venous catheters (CVC)that can adversely affect patient outcomes. A rural hospital in Pennsylvania decided to evaluate their CVC insertion and dressing change practice due to unsatisfactory BSI rates. In 2006, ICU nurses and providers came together to initiate a practice change to include the mandatory use of drapes, gowns, gloves and caps during all CVC procedures. Evaluation of this change included staff review and root cause analysis of each BSI. As a result, BSI infections decreased from 13 to 7 per month. This practice improvement was short lived, lasting 12 months, as each provider and nurse was responsible to gather their own supplies. Then, in 2008, through a collaborative approach between the hospitals Nursing Practice and Quality Councils, several evidenced based practice (EBP) strategies were implemented to address the hospitals BSI rate at large. The ICU representatives from these councils, along with the ICU Clinical Nurse Specialist, took the lead to readdress the ICUs BSI rate. Successful EBP strategies in the ICU included the implementation of a CVC insertion and dressing change bundle, adoption of the hospitals policy change to utilize the Biopatch and Chlorhexidine scrub; one on one training for more than 60 registered nurses; ongoing staff evaluation of the bundles; and monthly data review with root cause analysis for each infection. To date, this ICU has been able to sustain a BSI rate of 0.0 for 12 months.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:15:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:15:02Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 14th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 13-15 October, 2010 at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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