2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182246
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unit Based Ethics Conversations: A Transformational Experience in Ethics for Nurses
Author(s):
Hancock, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Hancock, RN, MSN, Clarian Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mmhancoc@clarian.org
Abstract:
Many factors conspire to limit nurses opportunity to reflect on the burden they bear in providing care to patients, particularly in ethically challenging situations. Unit Based Ethics Conversations (UBECs) were created in response to an identified need for meaningful conversation among caregivers about the ethical issues they faced in clinical practice and the moral distress associated with these situations. The mission of UBEC is to create an environment with morally open space where reflective dialogue and experiential narratives are encouraged. The goals of the program are to increase participants abilities in dealing with ethically challenging situations. This presentation will describe a formal evaluation of the program, specifically What impact if any has the UBEC program had on participants self report of ability to manage ethically troubling situations in their clinical practice? Six nursing units participated in the evaluation. 149 nurses responded to an on-line survey and 8 nurses participated in focus group discussions about their experience with UBECs. Survey responses suggest the nurses value the resource and would recommend UBECs to colleagues. Early evaluations of focus group discussions indicate nurses who attend UBECs gain skills in participating in difficult discussions about ethical issues with nurses and their physician colleagues, resulting in more open communication when these situations arise in the course of patient care. Additionally, focus group participants describe becoming more aware of and sensitive to the nuances embedded in ethically challenging situations. Results from this project suggest UBECs are a valuable resource for nurses who face ethically challenging situations. References: American Nurses Association , Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements. American Nurses Association: Washington, DC.; Boyle, D., Miller, P., and Forbes-Thompson, S. 2005. Communication and end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly. 28: 302-316. ; Corley, M., Minick, P., Elswick, R., and Jacobs, M. 2005. Nurses moral distress and ethical work environment. Nursing Ethics. 12: 381-390.; Gordon, E. and Hamric, A. 2006. The courage to stand up: The cultural politics of nurses access to ethics consultation. The Journal of Clinical Ethics. 17: 231-254.; Jameton, Andrew. 1993. Dilemmas of moral distress: Moral responsibility and nursing practice. AWHONNs Clinical Issues in Perinatal and Womens Health Nursing. 4: 542-551; Meltzer, L. and Huckabay, L. 2004. Critical care nurses perceptions of futile care and its effect on burnout. American Journal of Critical Care. 13: 202-208.; Oberle, K. and Hughes, D. 2001. Doctors and nurses perceptions of ethical problems in end-of-life decisions. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 33:707-715.; Rushton, Cindy., and Brooks-Brunn, JoAnn. 1997. Environments that support ethical practice. New Horizons. 5: 20-29.; Storch, J., Rodney, P., Pauly, B., Brown, H., and Starzomski, R. 2002. Listening to Nurses moral voices: Building a quality health care environment. Canadian Journal of Nursing Leadership. 15: 4; 7-16. ; Walker, M. 1993. Keeping moral spaces open. Hastings Center Report. 23(2): 33-38. ; Zuzelo, P. 2007. Exploring the moral distress of registered nurses. Nursing Ethics. 14: 344-359.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnit Based Ethics Conversations: A Transformational Experience in Ethics for Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHancock, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Hancock, RN, MSN, Clarian Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: mmhancoc@clarian.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182246-
dc.description.abstractMany factors conspire to limit nurses opportunity to reflect on the burden they bear in providing care to patients, particularly in ethically challenging situations. Unit Based Ethics Conversations (UBECs) were created in response to an identified need for meaningful conversation among caregivers about the ethical issues they faced in clinical practice and the moral distress associated with these situations. The mission of UBEC is to create an environment with morally open space where reflective dialogue and experiential narratives are encouraged. The goals of the program are to increase participants abilities in dealing with ethically challenging situations. This presentation will describe a formal evaluation of the program, specifically What impact if any has the UBEC program had on participants self report of ability to manage ethically troubling situations in their clinical practice? Six nursing units participated in the evaluation. 149 nurses responded to an on-line survey and 8 nurses participated in focus group discussions about their experience with UBECs. Survey responses suggest the nurses value the resource and would recommend UBECs to colleagues. Early evaluations of focus group discussions indicate nurses who attend UBECs gain skills in participating in difficult discussions about ethical issues with nurses and their physician colleagues, resulting in more open communication when these situations arise in the course of patient care. Additionally, focus group participants describe becoming more aware of and sensitive to the nuances embedded in ethically challenging situations. Results from this project suggest UBECs are a valuable resource for nurses who face ethically challenging situations. References: American Nurses Association , Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements. American Nurses Association: Washington, DC.; Boyle, D., Miller, P., and Forbes-Thompson, S. 2005. Communication and end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Nursing Quarterly. 28: 302-316. ; Corley, M., Minick, P., Elswick, R., and Jacobs, M. 2005. Nurses moral distress and ethical work environment. Nursing Ethics. 12: 381-390.; Gordon, E. and Hamric, A. 2006. The courage to stand up: The cultural politics of nurses access to ethics consultation. The Journal of Clinical Ethics. 17: 231-254.; Jameton, Andrew. 1993. Dilemmas of moral distress: Moral responsibility and nursing practice. AWHONNs Clinical Issues in Perinatal and Womens Health Nursing. 4: 542-551; Meltzer, L. and Huckabay, L. 2004. Critical care nurses perceptions of futile care and its effect on burnout. American Journal of Critical Care. 13: 202-208.; Oberle, K. and Hughes, D. 2001. Doctors and nurses perceptions of ethical problems in end-of-life decisions. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 33:707-715.; Rushton, Cindy., and Brooks-Brunn, JoAnn. 1997. Environments that support ethical practice. New Horizons. 5: 20-29.; Storch, J., Rodney, P., Pauly, B., Brown, H., and Starzomski, R. 2002. Listening to Nurses moral voices: Building a quality health care environment. Canadian Journal of Nursing Leadership. 15: 4; 7-16. ; Walker, M. 1993. Keeping moral spaces open. Hastings Center Report. 23(2): 33-38. ; Zuzelo, P. 2007. Exploring the moral distress of registered nurses. Nursing Ethics. 14: 344-359.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:15:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:15:39Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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