Patient Outcomes in a Community Nurse-Managed Outpatient Wound Clinic that Utilizes Evidenced-Based Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Outcomes in a Community Nurse-Managed Outpatient Wound Clinic that Utilizes Evidenced-Based Outcomes
Author(s):
Hendricks, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Hendricks, MSN, RN, EdD, Indiana University Kokomo, Kokomo, Indiana, USA, email: shendric@iuk.edu
Abstract:
A nurse managed outpatient wound clinic that follows current published evidenced based practice guidelines in wound care (Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society) was effective in achieving excellent wound healing outcomes. There is little literature published on wound healing rates in independent outpatient settings and less in nurse managed wound clinics. This study documented patient outcomes for common chronic wounds experienced in the rural Midwestern community using a descriptive retrospective design. Data collected over 21 months included 148 discharged patients with 272 wounds. Wound types consisted of venous stasis ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, surgical wounds, traumatic wounds and a class of others. Wound area (length x width) was used to report wound size on admission and at 4 week intervals in the statistical analysis phase. A significant decrease in wound area was noted in the first 4 weeks of treatment, indicating that the use of evidenced based wound care in a nurse managed outpatient clinic have the similar outcomes that have been reported in non-nurse managed clinics, supporting the notion that small rural nurse managed outpatient wound clinics can demonstrate excellent outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Outcomes in a Community Nurse-Managed Outpatient Wound Clinic that Utilizes Evidenced-Based Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHendricks, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Hendricks, MSN, RN, EdD, Indiana University Kokomo, Kokomo, Indiana, USA, email: shendric@iuk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182251-
dc.description.abstractA nurse managed outpatient wound clinic that follows current published evidenced based practice guidelines in wound care (Wound Ostomy Continence Nurses Society) was effective in achieving excellent wound healing outcomes. There is little literature published on wound healing rates in independent outpatient settings and less in nurse managed wound clinics. This study documented patient outcomes for common chronic wounds experienced in the rural Midwestern community using a descriptive retrospective design. Data collected over 21 months included 148 discharged patients with 272 wounds. Wound types consisted of venous stasis ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, surgical wounds, traumatic wounds and a class of others. Wound area (length x width) was used to report wound size on admission and at 4 week intervals in the statistical analysis phase. A significant decrease in wound area was noted in the first 4 weeks of treatment, indicating that the use of evidenced based wound care in a nurse managed outpatient clinic have the similar outcomes that have been reported in non-nurse managed clinics, supporting the notion that small rural nurse managed outpatient wound clinics can demonstrate excellent outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:15:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:15:54Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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