2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182255
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Breath of Life: Using Bubble CPAP to Decrease Chronic Lung Disease in Premature Infants
Author(s):
Hilburn, Vicki
Author Details:
Vicki Hilburn, RNC, Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, email: vickihilburn@texashealth.org
Abstract:
The cause of chronic lung disease in premature infants is multi-factorial, but the incidence is higher in those who require a ventilator for respiratory support. The mechanisms the ventilator uses can actually harm the lungs of the premature infant by providing too much volume or pressure. Intubation itself can cause trauma or initiate an inflammatory cascade which also contributes to lung damage. It was our goal to increase our use of a non-invasive type of respiratory support in order to decrease our rate of chronic lung disease. Bubble CPAP is a non-invasive method of respiratory support which provides oxygen and a small amount of constant pressure to the infants lungs. This pressure gently holds tiny alveoli open, which permits efficient gas exchange with less potential for damage to the tissues. A cohort of 114 VLBW infants born 9 months since BCPAP implementation are compared to 341 VLBW infants born during the preceding 20 months. Process implementation measures: CPAP as initial mode of stabilization, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Primary outcome measure is rate of CLD or Death. 2-tailed p-values calculated for continuous variables by unpaired t-test, categorical variables by Fisher s exact, RR with 95% CI for clinical outcomes. In less than one year after the project implementation, initial use of CPAP has increased by 40%, conventional ventilator use decreased by 26%, and the rate of CLD decreased 9%. There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes. All data is supportive of a successful implementation with positive outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Breath of Life: Using Bubble CPAP to Decrease Chronic Lung Disease in Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHilburn, Vickien_US
dc.author.detailsVicki Hilburn, RNC, Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital, Fort Worth, Texas, USA, email: vickihilburn@texashealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182255-
dc.description.abstractThe cause of chronic lung disease in premature infants is multi-factorial, but the incidence is higher in those who require a ventilator for respiratory support. The mechanisms the ventilator uses can actually harm the lungs of the premature infant by providing too much volume or pressure. Intubation itself can cause trauma or initiate an inflammatory cascade which also contributes to lung damage. It was our goal to increase our use of a non-invasive type of respiratory support in order to decrease our rate of chronic lung disease. Bubble CPAP is a non-invasive method of respiratory support which provides oxygen and a small amount of constant pressure to the infants lungs. This pressure gently holds tiny alveoli open, which permits efficient gas exchange with less potential for damage to the tissues. A cohort of 114 VLBW infants born 9 months since BCPAP implementation are compared to 341 VLBW infants born during the preceding 20 months. Process implementation measures: CPAP as initial mode of stabilization, intubation, and mechanical ventilation. Primary outcome measure is rate of CLD or Death. 2-tailed p-values calculated for continuous variables by unpaired t-test, categorical variables by Fisher s exact, RR with 95% CI for clinical outcomes. In less than one year after the project implementation, initial use of CPAP has increased by 40%, conventional ventilator use decreased by 26%, and the rate of CLD decreased 9%. There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes. All data is supportive of a successful implementation with positive outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:05Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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