2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182258
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hospital Mission and Ethical Climate
Author(s):
Huerta, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Huerta, PhD, RN, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Susan_Huerta@rush.edu
Abstract:
Ethical climate is defined as a sense exemplifying the conscientious nature that evolves through and is influenced by organizational members, values, culture, processes, structures and relationships, perceptions, expectations, and practices (Schneider. 1983). Mission, as an antecedent of an organizational ethical climate, is often cited by business and healthcare leaders as a singular influence on employee perceptions and behaviors. A relationship between mission and perception of ethical climate is posited in a model of nursing ethical climate and has not been studied in hospitals or other healthcare organizations. If there is a relationship it is important for nurses working in hospital and other healthcare settings because the ethical climate of an organization can foster or thwart compliance with professional standards and influence personal decisions to stay with an organization. Three-hundred-twenty-two staff nurses at 3 medical centers, 2 magnet and 1 on the journey, participated. Two instruments: the Management of Meaning Scale, measuring discussion of mission, and Hospital Ethical Climate Survey, measuring perception of ethical climate, were used. Results demonstrate a positive relationship between the hospital mission, as framed through discussion of its meaning, and the nurses perception of the hospital ethical climate. Further analysis suggests that individual work units dont exert any additional influence on nurses perception of the ethical climate than the organization as a whole. These findings are important for nurse and organizational leaders trying to improve work climates to support professional practice. References: Dendaas, N. (2004). The scholarship related to nursing work environments: Where to we go from here? Advances in Nursing Science, 27, 1, 12-20.; Hart, S. E. (2005). Hospital ethical climates and registered nurses turnover intentions. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 37, 2, 173-177.; Liaschenko, J. & Peter, E. (2004). Nursing ethics and conceptualizations of nursing: Profession, practice, and work. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 46, 5, 488-495.; Luthans, K. W., & Jensen, S. M. (2005). The linkage between psychological capital and commitment to organizational mission. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35, 6, 304-310.; McClure, M.L. & Hinshaw, A.S. (2002). Magnet Hospitals Revisited: Attraction and Retention of Professional Nurses. American Nurses Association, Washington, DC.; Pattison, S. (2001). Are nursing codes of practice ethical? Nursing Ethics, 8, 1, 5-15.; Shirey, M. R. (2005). Ethical climate in nursing practice. JONAs Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation, 7, 2, 59-64.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHospital Mission and Ethical Climateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuerta, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Huerta, PhD, RN, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: Susan_Huerta@rush.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182258-
dc.description.abstractEthical climate is defined as a sense exemplifying the conscientious nature that evolves through and is influenced by organizational members, values, culture, processes, structures and relationships, perceptions, expectations, and practices (Schneider. 1983). Mission, as an antecedent of an organizational ethical climate, is often cited by business and healthcare leaders as a singular influence on employee perceptions and behaviors. A relationship between mission and perception of ethical climate is posited in a model of nursing ethical climate and has not been studied in hospitals or other healthcare organizations. If there is a relationship it is important for nurses working in hospital and other healthcare settings because the ethical climate of an organization can foster or thwart compliance with professional standards and influence personal decisions to stay with an organization. Three-hundred-twenty-two staff nurses at 3 medical centers, 2 magnet and 1 on the journey, participated. Two instruments: the Management of Meaning Scale, measuring discussion of mission, and Hospital Ethical Climate Survey, measuring perception of ethical climate, were used. Results demonstrate a positive relationship between the hospital mission, as framed through discussion of its meaning, and the nurses perception of the hospital ethical climate. Further analysis suggests that individual work units dont exert any additional influence on nurses perception of the ethical climate than the organization as a whole. These findings are important for nurse and organizational leaders trying to improve work climates to support professional practice. References: Dendaas, N. (2004). The scholarship related to nursing work environments: Where to we go from here? Advances in Nursing Science, 27, 1, 12-20.; Hart, S. E. (2005). Hospital ethical climates and registered nurses turnover intentions. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 37, 2, 173-177.; Liaschenko, J. & Peter, E. (2004). Nursing ethics and conceptualizations of nursing: Profession, practice, and work. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 46, 5, 488-495.; Luthans, K. W., & Jensen, S. M. (2005). The linkage between psychological capital and commitment to organizational mission. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35, 6, 304-310.; McClure, M.L. & Hinshaw, A.S. (2002). Magnet Hospitals Revisited: Attraction and Retention of Professional Nurses. American Nurses Association, Washington, DC.; Pattison, S. (2001). Are nursing codes of practice ethical? Nursing Ethics, 8, 1, 5-15.; Shirey, M. R. (2005). Ethical climate in nursing practice. JONAs Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation, 7, 2, 59-64.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:13Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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