2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182260
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Description of Correlates and Factors Contributing to Medication Errors in Acute Care Nurses
Author(s):
Jastremski, Connie
Author Details:
Connie Jastremski, MS, MBA, RN, ANP-BC, FCCM, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: connie.jastremski@bassett.org
Abstract:
Medication errors in hospitals are common and can occur from procurement of the drug, to documentation of administration (IOM, 2000). Correlates and factors contributing to errors remain unknown, making it difficult to systematically address the problem. Guided by Benner's (1982) theory of Novice to Expert this descriptive study attempted to understand factors associated with specific clinician demographics and medication errors through a 6-month retrospective review of acute care units. Findings (N= 96 errors, 73 nurses) indicate the average age of nurses, RNs (65), LPNs (8) was 43 years. The mean number of years experience was 9 years, with nurses being in their current role an average of 5 years. This is not consistent with Benners framework and dispels the assumption that medication errors are made by new graduates. There were not a higher percentage of reported errors in early summer months when new graduates were orienting to their roles. The majority of errors, primarily omissions and wrong doses, were made in the first 5 hours of the shift, the first day a nurse returned to work suggesting unfamiliarity with patients is a contributing factor. Productivity (NCH/PCH) averaged at 119%. A high percentage of errors are related to 1-time orders suggesting that there was a systems problem related to a 5-day Medication Administration Record (MAR) and placement of single dose MAR labels on the back of MARs for one-time orders. A one-day MAR with a special section for 1-time orders is being trialed. Specific practice and continuing education interventions for experienced nurses are....
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Description of Correlates and Factors Contributing to Medication Errors in Acute Care Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJastremski, Connieen_US
dc.author.detailsConnie Jastremski, MS, MBA, RN, ANP-BC, FCCM, The Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, New York, USA, email: connie.jastremski@bassett.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182260-
dc.description.abstractMedication errors in hospitals are common and can occur from procurement of the drug, to documentation of administration (IOM, 2000). Correlates and factors contributing to errors remain unknown, making it difficult to systematically address the problem. Guided by Benner's (1982) theory of Novice to Expert this descriptive study attempted to understand factors associated with specific clinician demographics and medication errors through a 6-month retrospective review of acute care units. Findings (N= 96 errors, 73 nurses) indicate the average age of nurses, RNs (65), LPNs (8) was 43 years. The mean number of years experience was 9 years, with nurses being in their current role an average of 5 years. This is not consistent with Benners framework and dispels the assumption that medication errors are made by new graduates. There were not a higher percentage of reported errors in early summer months when new graduates were orienting to their roles. The majority of errors, primarily omissions and wrong doses, were made in the first 5 hours of the shift, the first day a nurse returned to work suggesting unfamiliarity with patients is a contributing factor. Productivity (NCH/PCH) averaged at 119%. A high percentage of errors are related to 1-time orders suggesting that there was a systems problem related to a 5-day Medication Administration Record (MAR) and placement of single dose MAR labels on the back of MARs for one-time orders. A one-day MAR with a special section for 1-time orders is being trialed. Specific practice and continuing education interventions for experienced nurses are....en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:18Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.