2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182262
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Innovative Peer Review Strategies in Implementing Best Practice Medication Reconciliation Process
Author(s):
Jones, Nicole
Author Details:
Nicole Jones, MN, RN-BC, CCRN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CCNS, East Jefferson General Hospital, Metairie, Louisiana, USA, email: njjones@ejgh.org
Abstract:
Our community hospital began piloting a Medication Reconciliation (MR) process in 2005. The lessons we learned during our pilot helped us to develop an electronic strategy when our electronic medical record went live in 2006. During our Joint Commission survey in November of 2006, we were thrilled when our surveyors commented that our MR processes were best practice. Unfortunately, our Admission MR process was not consistently used. To aid with increased compliance and accuracy, our team employed multiple forms of peer review with exciting outcomes. To increase compliance with the Admission MR process, our charge nurses audited every patient at the time of admission and provided direct, on-the-spot feedback to each nurse. Physician feedback was given to our physician champion, who reviewed data with his colleagues throughout the hospital. Physicians with 100% compliance were recognized weekly. Over ten weeks, Admission MR process compliance rose from 26% to sustained compliance of 90%! At the time of discharge, our staff was using the defined process, but we were having problems with the accuracy of the medication list given to the patient. A Discharge Med Rec Double-Check process was implemented. Once the discharging nurse has created the home medication list for the patient based on instructions from the attending physician, she then hands the chart to another staff nurse, who double-checks the list for accuracy. Through this process of peer review at the point of care and constant feedback, our Discharge MR accuracy has improved from 67% to sustained accuracy of 90%!
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInnovative Peer Review Strategies in Implementing Best Practice Medication Reconciliation Processen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Nicoleen_US
dc.author.detailsNicole Jones, MN, RN-BC, CCRN, APRN, ACNS-BC, CCNS, East Jefferson General Hospital, Metairie, Louisiana, USA, email: njjones@ejgh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182262-
dc.description.abstractOur community hospital began piloting a Medication Reconciliation (MR) process in 2005. The lessons we learned during our pilot helped us to develop an electronic strategy when our electronic medical record went live in 2006. During our Joint Commission survey in November of 2006, we were thrilled when our surveyors commented that our MR processes were best practice. Unfortunately, our Admission MR process was not consistently used. To aid with increased compliance and accuracy, our team employed multiple forms of peer review with exciting outcomes. To increase compliance with the Admission MR process, our charge nurses audited every patient at the time of admission and provided direct, on-the-spot feedback to each nurse. Physician feedback was given to our physician champion, who reviewed data with his colleagues throughout the hospital. Physicians with 100% compliance were recognized weekly. Over ten weeks, Admission MR process compliance rose from 26% to sustained compliance of 90%! At the time of discharge, our staff was using the defined process, but we were having problems with the accuracy of the medication list given to the patient. A Discharge Med Rec Double-Check process was implemented. Once the discharging nurse has created the home medication list for the patient based on instructions from the attending physician, she then hands the chart to another staff nurse, who double-checks the list for accuracy. Through this process of peer review at the point of care and constant feedback, our Discharge MR accuracy has improved from 67% to sustained accuracy of 90%!en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:24Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.