2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182271
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lessening Injuries Follows Training: LIFT Equipment Impact
Author(s):
Koss, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Koss, RN, MSN, St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Covington, Kentucky, USA, email: kkoss@stelizabeth.com
Abstract:
National workplace injury rates for nurses exceed the national workplace injury rates for workers in manufacturing, construction, or mining. Historically, strains and sprains caused by overexertion due to patient handling has been a costly employee injury. The American Nurses Association (ANA) Position Statement concluded Patient handling can be performed safely with the use of assistive equipment.the use of assistive equipment leads to a reduction in caregiver injuries and better patient care (ANA Website, 2003 Handle with Care). A year long study included 788 new hire and current employees engaged in any patient handling. All received safe patient handling instruction and competency checks. All new hires received a four- hour training session and current employees received a one- hour training session and competency check at their annual mandatory in service day. There were two research study questions. Does training in selecting and using the appropriate assistive lift equipment result in a reduction in injuries, lost work days and replacement costs? The study through third quarter of 2007 compared with 2008 showed a 42% reduction in employee injuries and a 32% reduction in lost work days. The second study question was What reasons might the employee choose not to use the equipment? Responses to this question helped to explain why staff continue to have injuries.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Louisville, Kentucky, USA
Description:
"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLessening Injuries Follows Training: LIFT Equipment Impacten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKoss, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Koss, RN, MSN, St. Elizabeth Medical Center, Covington, Kentucky, USA, email: kkoss@stelizabeth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182271-
dc.description.abstractNational workplace injury rates for nurses exceed the national workplace injury rates for workers in manufacturing, construction, or mining. Historically, strains and sprains caused by overexertion due to patient handling has been a costly employee injury. The American Nurses Association (ANA) Position Statement concluded Patient handling can be performed safely with the use of assistive equipment.the use of assistive equipment leads to a reduction in caregiver injuries and better patient care (ANA Website, 2003 Handle with Care). A year long study included 788 new hire and current employees engaged in any patient handling. All received safe patient handling instruction and competency checks. All new hires received a four- hour training session and current employees received a one- hour training session and competency check at their annual mandatory in service day. There were two research study questions. Does training in selecting and using the appropriate assistive lift equipment result in a reduction in injuries, lost work days and replacement costs? The study through third quarter of 2007 compared with 2008 showed a 42% reduction in employee injuries and a 32% reduction in lost work days. The second study question was What reasons might the employee choose not to use the equipment? Responses to this question helped to explain why staff continue to have injuries.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:16:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:16:48Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationLouisville, Kentucky, USAen_US
dc.description"Magnet: Inspiring Innovation, Achieving Outcomes" was the theme and "Explore the relationship among leadership, innovation, and nursing practice outcomes" was the goal of the 13th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 1-3 October, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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